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Ancestors of NANCY SUE RICHARDS

Notes


16. THOMAS RICHARDS

FAMILY HISTORY FOR THOMAS RICHARDS
ELIZABETH TOWNSHIP

Biographical Directory
From "The History of JoDaviess County Illinois"
by H.F. Kett & Co., 1878

RICHARDS THOMAS, Farmer; Sec. 24; P.O. Elizabeth; born in England Nov. 11, 1815; came to America in 1837; settled in Pottsville, Pa.; went from there to Big Sandy, 35 miles south of St. Louis; from there to Wisconsin, and then returned to Pa.; came to Jo Daviess Co. in 1850, and his home has been here ever since; married Peggy James at Bloomsburg, Pa., July 4, 1840; she was born Sept. 10, 1824, and came to America at the age of 6 years; they have six children living: John Henry, born Sept. 24, 1843; Thomas, June 27, 1849; Tobias, Aug. 21, 1852; Joseph, Aug. 21, 1854; Geo. W., June 29, 1859; Susan H., Jan. 27, 1866; have lost two children; Mr. Richards has been an extensive traveler during his life; he delights to talk of Pennsylvania as his home in America around which many pleasant memories linger.
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MORE RESEARCH NEEDS TO BE DONE ON THIS: I HAVE ADDED IT IN TO SEE WHAT WE CAN FIND AT A LATER POINT. IT MAY COST MONEY TO OBTAIN THIS INFORMATION.
1880 CENSUS INDEX
Jo Daviess Co.,

This index is based on the following National Archives census films delineating Jo Daviess County Illinois: T 9, #216, 217.
This index lists all heads of households, and others living within that household, and a parent if within the household. The index lists an A & B after each page number; this is because there are two (2) per number. The even pages of the township delineation is B, the odd being A. Our page numbers are based on the stamped number in the right hand corner of every other page.
T9, 216: contents: T9, 217: Contents:

JO DAVIESS:
WISHON, Martin 306A - We - Wo

The Jo Daviess County ILGenWeb greatfully acknowledges the tremendous work in the transcription done by Marjorie Smith to complete this listing. Thank You Marjorie!

Wishon, Catherine ElizabthVil 106B 1870 CENSUS index
1870 CENSUS INDEX, JO DAVIESS COUNTY

RICHARDS, Edwin 22 RICHARDS, Elizabeth 86 RICHARDS, Frederick 36 RICHARDS, James 209 RICHARDS, John 86, 287, 330, 354 RICHARDS, Mary 290 RICHARDS, Thomas 108 RICHARDS, Truman B. 129 RICHARDS, William 34, 86, 289, 307.
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THOMAS RICHARDS SON "TOBIAS RICHARDS:
Household:
Name-Relation-Marital-Status-Gender-Race-Age-Birthplace-Occupation Father's Birthplace-Mother's Birthplace

George GREEN-Self-Married-Male-White-age 37-WI-Carpenter-ENG-ENG  
Frances H. GREEN-Wife-M-Female-White-age 33-WI-Keeping House-ENG-ENG  
George E. GREEN-Son-Single-Male-White-age 12-IL-At School-WI-WI  
Caroline M. GREEN-Dau-Single-Female-White-age 9-IL-WI-WI  
*****Tobias RICHARDS-Other-W-Male-White-age 28-IL-Miner-ENG-ENG*****
Susan ADAMS-Other-Single-Female-White-age 22-IL-Servant-ENG-ENG  
Isaac WILCOX-Other-Married-Male-White-age 35-ENG-Miner-ENG-ENG  
John M. TURNER-Other-Married-Male-White-age 46-KY-Miner-KY-KY  
George GOYEN-Other-Single-Male-White-age 15-MI-Hostler-ENG-ENG  
James HENRY-Other-Single-Male-White-age 19-IRE-Blacksmith-IRE-IRE  
Benjamin TART-Other-W-Male-White-age 78-KY-KY-KY  
Felix CLARK-Other-Single-Male-White-age 56-IL-Laborer-VA-IRE  
Amelia DAVIESS-Other-Single-Female-White-age 24-IL-School Teacher   ---------------------------------------------------------------------Source Information:
 Census Place Elizabeth, Jo Daviess, Illinois
  Family History Library Film   1254217
  NA Film Number   T9-0217
  Page Number   317A        
---------------------------------------------------------------------© 1999-2002 by Intellectual Reserve, Inc.  All rights reserved.  English approval: 3/1999
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THOMAS RICHARDS AND PEGGY JAMES HAD THE FOLLOWING CHILDREN:

1) JOSEPH EDWARD RICHARDS BORN 21 AUG 1854 IN ELIZABETH TOWNSHIP, ILLINOIS, MARRIED 6 MARCH 1873 IN ELIZABETH TOWNSHIP, ILLINOIS. MARRIED PARMELIA WHISON BORN 7 SEPTEMBER 1854 IN ELIZABETH TOWNSHIP, ILLINOIS.
2)JOHN HENRY RICHARDS BORN 24 SEPTEMBER 1843 IN JO DAVIES COUNTY,   ELIZABETH, MO.
3) THOMAS RICHARDS BORN 27 JUN 1849 IN JO DAVIES COUNTY, ELIZABETH,   MO.
4) TOBIAS RICHARDS BORN 21 AUGUST 1852 IN JO DAVIES COUNTY, ELIZABETH, MO. HE MARRIED TO MARY ANN JONES ON 7 JULY 1875 IN JO DAVIES COUNTY, ELIZABETH TOWNSHIP, ILLINOIS.
5) GEORGE W. RICHARDS BORN 29 JUNE 1875
6) SUSAN H. RICHARDS BORN 27 JANUARY 1866 IN ELIZABETH TOWNSHIP, JO DAVIES, ILLINOIS.
7)(UNKNOWN) RICHARDS-PASSED
8)(UNKNOWN) RICHARDS-PASSED


17. PEGGY JAMES

Household Record  1880 United States Census  Search results
---------------------------------------------------------------------Household:
Name  Relation Marital Status Gender Race Age Birthplace Occupation Father's Birthplace Mother's Birthplace;

Peggy RICHARDS-Self-Widow-Female-White-age 54-ENG-Keep House-ENG-ENG  
George RICHARDS-Son-Single-Male-White-age 21-IL-On Farm-ENG-ENG  
Susan RICHARDS-Daughter-Single-Female-White-age 14-IL-At Home-ENG-ENG ---------------------------------------------------------------------Source Information:
 Census Place Elizabeth, Jo Daviess, Illinois
  Family History Library Film   1254216
  NA Film Number   T9-0216
  Page Number   308C        
---------------------------------------------------------------------© 1999-2002 by Intellectual Reserve, Inc.  All rights reserved.  English approval: 3/1999
Use of this site constitutes your acceptance of these Conditions of Use (last updated: 3/22/1999).
Privacy Policy (last updated: 11/24/2004).    28    http://www.familysearch.org   v.2.5.0


18. MARTIN WISHON

WISHON MARTIN, Retired; Elizabeth; born in Cumberland Co., Ky., Dec. 19, 1822; came to Jo Daviess Co. in the spring of 1841; has since resided here; owns the land on which the famous Wishon diggings were struck, from which more mineral has been raised than any diggings in the mining regions; owns 400 acres of land; has a fine residence in Elizabeth, surrounded by beautiful evergreens and shrubbery, which Shenstone might have envied; married Catherine Tenyck, July 20, 1850; she was born in Dutchess Co., N.Y., Sept. 27, 1831; they have five children living: Permelia, born Sept. 7, 1854; Nancy Jane, Sept. 25, 1858; Julia, Jan. 20, 1863; Cora B., March 16, 1867; Edith, Aug. 11, 1871; have lost five children; two of the daughters are now attending the Mount Carroll Seminary; Mr. Wishon is a genial, generous man, full of noble impulses; feels disposed to give his children all the chances for education and the accomplishments of music, drawing, etc., that wealth can purchase or fancy can suggest.

Elizabeth Township
Jo Daviess County, Illinois
The Township of Elizabeth has long been a township of great importance in the county. Its early settlers were attracted thereto by the mines. Jefferson Clark, John McDonald, John D. Winters and Clark Stone were among the earliest settlers. Afterwards came Benjamin Clark. Within its bounds was a fort which was attacked by the Indians during the Black Hawk War, but the Indians were repulsed. The village of Elizabeth is within the township. For years it was an inland village, but since the Chicago Great Western Railroad has passed through its borders, it has become a place of great importance and is constantly improving. Near the village of Elizabeth was one of the best mines ever discovered in the county, which was called the "Wishon Mine." Here were turned out vast quantities of lead ore. It had not been operated for the past thirty years until during the year 1903, when a company called the Wishon Mining Company, with a capital of $1,000,000, leased the mine and contemplate searching for a lower run of ore. Elizabeth has been of importance in a political sense. It has furnished to the State at least three State Senators, namely: W. A. Little, Henry Green and John C. McKenzie, one of whom (John C. McKenzie) was acting Governor of the State. In 1847 there were within the bounds of Elizabeth Township, two post offices --one at Elizabeth, with William Boutwell as postmaster, and one at Weston, with Otis C. Bennet as postmaster.
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1870 CENSUS INDEX, JO DAVIESS COUNTY
WISHON, Martin  104
http://www.rootsweb.com/~iljodavi/census/1870censusindexTZ.htm
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Elizabeth Township
Jo Daviess County, Illinois
The Township of Elizabeth has long been a township of great importance in the county. Its early settlers were attracted thereto by the mines. Jefferson Clark, John McDonald, John D. Winters and Clark Stone were among the earliest settlers. Afterwards came Benjamin Clark. Within its bounds was a fort which was attacked by the Indians during the Black Hawk War, but the Indians were repulsed. The village of Elizabeth is within the township. For years it was an inland village, but since the Chicago Great Western Railroad has passed through its borders, it has become a place of great importance and is constantly improving. Near the village of Elizabeth was one of the best mines ever discovered in the county, which was called the "Wishon Mine." Here were turned out vast quantities of lead ore. It had not been operated for the past thirty years until during the year 1903, when a company called the Wishon Mining Company, with a capital of $1,000,000, leased the mine and contemplate searching for a lower run of ore. Elizabeth has been of importance in a political sense. It has furnished to the State at least three State Senators, namely: W. A. Little, Henry Green and John C. McKenzie, one of whom (John C. McKenzie) was acting Governor of the State. In 1847 there were within the bounds of Elizabeth Township, two post offices --one at Elizabeth, with William Boutwell as postmaster, and one at Weston, with Otis C. Bennet as postmaster.
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"Mining History"
from History of Jo Daviess County   1904
   There is no question but that the early settlement of Jo Daviess County was caused by its mines. Just when those mines were first discovered is shrouded in mystery, although it is certain that a Frenchman by the name of LeSueur saw the mines as early as the month of August, 1700.
   He was on a trading expedition to the Indians in what is now the State of Minnesota and, in his report of that expedition, he says he discovered a small river entering the Mississippi on the right side and describes it as "a river running from the north, but it turns to the northeast. On the right of said river, seven leagues from the Mississippi River, is a lead mine, and he named the small river, thus discovered by him, the "River of the Mines."
   This river was, beyond doubt, what is now known as Galena River. The writer has examined a map of the State of Illinois which was published in 1820, and Galena River is named on said map as the "River of Mines." The geography of the country was then but little known. In 1712 Louis XIV of France granted in perpetuity to one Anthony Crozat and his heirs, all the property of the lead mine country of Louisiana, which was then supposed to include the mines of what is now included within the bounds of Jo Daviess County.
   The best evidence obtainable points to the fact that the mine known in early history as "The Buck Mine," located on Section 8 in West Galena, on lands now owned by the Hughlett estate, was the first discovered, and is doubtless the one seen by LeSueur. It has been worked more or less up to the present time.
   From a short historical account of the lead mines of the Northwest, published by the New England & Galena Mining Company, other early mines near Galena are mentioned as follows: The Harris Leads; Tomlin & Burrichter; The Tomlin; The Doe; The Krengle Mine; The Gaffner Range; The Hog Range; The Graves; Comstock and Rosemeyer; Wallo & Quick; Sanders & Co.; Molitore; Crumbacker; Evans & Adams; A. C. Davis; Armbruster & Co.; Ottawa Diggings; Drum, Rare & Co.; Benninger & Co.; P. Smith & Co.;. Hostetter & Co.; Dueer & CO.; Allendorf & Co.; Tom Evans; Bolton; Stephen Marsden; The Allenrath; The Egan; The J. E. Comstock; Britten & Wilkins; The Cady Range; The Roberts Range; The William Richards Range; The Wilcox & Co. Range. All these, with many others of lesser note, were within a short distance of the present limits of the City of Galena, and were all good producing mines.
   In addition to the above there were valuable mines located in the Township of Vinegar Hill, Council Hill, Rice and Elizabeth the latter, however, being a later discovery than those first named.  At a still later date valuable mines were discovered in the Township of Rice, better known as the Black Jack Mine and the New California Diggings, and these have been worked more or less continuously up to the present time. It is rather remarkable that, up to within recent years, all of the mines in Jo Daviess County were worked for lead ore exclusively. The vast quantities of zinc ore, which seems to underlie all lead ore in Jo Daviess County, was considered a worthless ore a despised material and, as the miners used to express it, "it burned the mineral out."
   Prof. Whitney, who is perhaps the best authority on-the lead-mining region, states that, from 1853 to 1859, the out-put of lead-ore from the mines of Jo Daviess County was thirty million pounds.
   The late Henry Green in 1875 stated that, up to that time, the out-put of the Elizabeth mines, alone, had been at least seventy-five million pounds.
   The late H. H. Houghton, in his work, entitled, "The Marsden Mines" (now known as the Black-Jack Mines), states that the out-put of the mines of Vinegar Hill has now reached the enormous sum of one hundred million pounds.
   A writer from Galena, whose name I have not been able to ascertain, in Harper's publication for the month of May, 1866, states that the value of the lead ore, produced by the mines of Jo Daviess County up to that time, was $40,000,000.
   During the early history of the mines, ore was sold as low as $8 per thousand; and it is on record that a thousand pounds of mineral has been exchanged for a barrel of flour. In one instance, at least, five thousand pounds were given for a barrel of flour. The highest price per thousand that has been known to have been paid was $110, which was during the War of the Rebellion-and this price was paid only for a short time. Since the year 1878 the average price of lead-ore per thousand has not exceeded $30, and it is doubtful if it has equaled that figure. It is now (1902) $22 per thousand. The ore is found in veins and flat sheets, -the horizontal veins being known to geologists as gash veins. It is found at various depths from the surface as far down as explorations have been made. The principal veins run east and west, and are known in the mines as "Easts and Wests;" other veins run north and south, and are known in the mines as "Norths and Souths." The north and south veins generally cross the east and west ranges at right angles. Besides these there are what are known as 11 quarterings," which usually cross the east and west crevices diagonally. Some of these quarterings, so-called, run from the northeast to the southwest, and some from the southeast to the northwest; these are locally called either "ten o'clocks" or "four o'clocks," according to the direction they assume. There are also smaller crevices, which usually cross the east and west ranges in various directions; these are locally called "swithers," though just why they are so called we have not been able to ascertain. The ore found in the crevices that run east and west is generally known as "cog mineral;" that found in the veins running north and south is generally of a sheet formation. It is a remarkable fact that no ore is found in any of the crevices without the same having been crossed by some other crevice, and the local expression is, "you will not find lead ore until you strike a crossing." Just why this is so is not known.
   The first work done in the mines was. beyond doubt, performed by the squaws, and their method of extracting the ore from the ground where it was found attached to the rock, was to build great fires and, when the rock had been sufficiently heated, throw water upon it, thus causing it to crack and enable it to be more easily worked. It may be added that the method of working the mines is still rather primitive.
   The Indians reduced the ore by piling up wood, putting the ore thereon and setting the wood on fire, thus melting the ore. Many such places, called "Indian furnaces," may still be found in the county.
   When the white miners first came they reduced the ore in much the same manner, only more skillfully, and their furnaces were called "log furnaces." Afterwards the Drummond furnace was introduced, also the cupola and the blast furnace-the latter being nothing more than the old "Scotch Hearth," a full description of which is subjoined, taken from Judge Shaw's geological work of Jo Daviess County.
   The hearth consists of a box of cast-iron, two feet square, one foot high, open at top, with the sides and bottom two inches thick. To the top of the front edge is affixed a sloping shelf, or hearth, called the work-stone, used for spreading the materials of the "charge" upon, as occasionally becomes necessary during smelting, and also for the excess of molten lead to flow down. For the latter purpose a groove, one-half an inch deep and an inch wide, runs diagonally across the work-stone. A ledge, one inch in thickness and height, surrounds the work-stone on all sides except that towards the sole of the furnace. The hearth slopes from behind forward, and immediately below the front edge of it is placed the receptacle or "melting pot." An inch from the bottom, in the posterior side of the box, is a hole two inches in diameter, through which the current or "blast" of air is blown from the bellows. The furnace is built under an immense chimney thirty to thirty-five feet high and ten feet wide at its base. Behind the base of the chimney is the bellows, which is propelled by a waterwheel, the tuyere, or point of the bellows, entering at the hole in the back of the box. The fuel, which consists of light wood, coke, and charcoal, is thrown in against the tuyere and kindled, and the ore is placed upon the fuel to the top of the box. The blast of air in the rear keeps the fire burning, and, as the reservoir, or box, is filled with molten lead, the excess flows down the grooved hearth into the "melting pot," under which a gentle fire is kept, and the lead is ladled from it into the molds as is convenient. Before adding a new "charge," the blast is turned off, the "charge" already in is turned forward upon the work-stone, more fuel is cast in, and the "charge" is thrown back with the addition of fresh ore upon the wood. The combustion of the sulphur in the ore produces a large amount of the heat required for smelting. The furnace is thus kept in operation sixteen hours out of the twenty-four.
   The ore is of different degrees of purity, but the purest galena does not yield, on an average, over 65 per cent of lead from the first process of smelting. The gray slag is very valuable, though the lead procured from it is harder than that 'of the first smelting. There is left about 75,000 of gray slag from each 1,000,000 pounds of (>re. The slag furnace is erected under the same roof with the Scotch Hearth, and has a chimney of its own a few feet from that of the hearth, and the "blast" 'is secured from the same water-power by an additional blast-pipe driven by the same wheel. It consists of a much larger reservoir, built of limestone cemented and lined with clay, with a cast-iron door in front heavily barred with iron. It will burn out so as to require repairs in about three months. Open at the top, the slag and fuel are thrown in promiscuously. Under the iron door is an escape, and below it is the "slag-pot." This is an oblong iron basin about a foot in depth, with one-third of its length partitioned off to receive the lead, which sinks as it escapes, while the slag, being lighter, flows in a flame-colored stream forward and falls into a reservoir that is partly filled with water, which cools the slag as it is plunged therein. As the reservoir fills, a workman shovels the scoriae into a hand-barrow and wheels it off. This scoriae is black slag and worthless, the lead having now been entirely extracted. The smelter now and then throws a shovel-full of -,ray slag into the furnace, which casts up beautiful parti-colored flames, while the strong sulphurous odor, the red-hot stream of slag, with the vapor arising from the tub 'wherein the hissing slag is plunged, the sooty smelters 'and the hot air of the furnace room, suggest a thought of the infernal regions. Outside, the wealth of "pigs"-not in the least porcine gives one a sort of covetous desire, that, if indulged in, we are taught leads directly to said regions.
  It may not be amiss in this connection to state that, in the early history of the mines, Illinoisans ran up the Mississippi River in boats in the spring, worked in the mines during the warm weather, and returned to their homes for the winter. This was supposed to be after the manner of a certain kind of fish, and for this reason they were called "suckers" by Missourians. Very soon, however, many miners from Missouri came to seek their fortune in the new El Dorado. A boat-load of these, landing at the wharf in Galena, a resident miner sang, "Hello! Missouri has taken a puke." Ever after that Illinoisans were called "Suckers," while Missourians were called "Pukes"-names by which they will be called by the vulgar for some time to come.
   It is also a remarkable fact, when you take into consideration that ore has been discovered in every one of the twenty-three townships in the county, what a small portion of the county has been explored for ore or "prospected," as the, mining term is. As compared with what is unexplored the explored portion is very insignificant. It can be stated with certainty that, if all the mines in the county were placed side by side, they could not cover more than a section of land, or six hundred and forty acres; and some idea can be gathered from this, to justify the assertion that untold quantities of ore still lie under the surface of Jo Daviess County. It can be stated with certainty, that, so far, little or nothing has been done more than surface mining.
   It is also a little remarkable that the zinc ore (called by the miners, "dry-bone" and "blackjack"), which, in the earliest history of the county, was a despised material, is now being sought for more than lead ore the reason being that. while not as valuable as the lead ore, the output, prospectively, is much greater, and companies are being formed to develop the zinc mines.
   A Wisconsin Company is now operating a zinc mine on the lands of Oldenburg in Section 1, about three miles from the City of Galena, which bids fair to be a mine of great value. The company is operating the mine with a view of reaching deposits much lower than have heretofore been developed, and the prospects are that the enterprise will be richly rewarded. At the California Mines in Rice Township, Harris & Co., of Chicago, are developing a mine. which promises large returns, in both lead and zinc ore.
   Within the City' of Galena, Wm. Waters has been working a mine for the past two or three years, and has be-en rewarded with good returns in the shape of zinc ore. It is claimed that his mine, which runs entirely through the corporate limits of the City of Galena from west to east, is a true "Fisher vein." His mine has been worked down to the water-level only, but has been worked at that level for a distance of over half a mile. The product has been largely zinc ore, although the mine also produces some lead ore, and it is claimed with a strong probability of truth, that far greater deposits exist -in those mines below the water level than have yet been developed. Mr. Waters claims that he can walk on ore at the water-level for a distance of over six hundred feet. -
   The mines in Elizabeth Township seem to have taken on a new lease of life, but they as yet produce only lead ore, although many believe-and with good ground for such belief -that, at a lower depth under the lead ore, exists a still greater deposit of zinc ore. We shall treat of the mines of that township more at length when we specifically speak of the township.
   As before stated, so far the mines of the county have been worked only to a limited extent; and in no sense have they been worked to any great depth, as no mine of which the writer has any knowledge has been worked to the depth of two hundred feet. The most of the ore has been taken from a depth of less than one hundred feet from the surface. It can be safely asserted that, nowhere in the United States are there mines which offer a fairer, return for capital invested, than the mines of .Jo Daviess County.
   Thus far mining in Jo Daviess County has been prosecuted by men with limited means, and in no -instance has any mine been developed to any great depth.
   In the judgment of those whose opinion is of value, with a larger use of capital and more adequate machinery, the mines of Jo Daviess County would be found to be practically inexhaustible.
   Besides lead and zinc, iron ore to a considerable extent has been found in the township of Derinda, and traces of copper have also been discovered.
   In one locality the writer has personally picked up specimens of quartz, and has seen "black sand," such as is found in the placer gold mines in the West, washed out of the ground, although he saw no gold. Mixed with the ores in the county is an element called sulphur, but which is really a Sulphide. Until recently it had no commercial value, but now it is worth six dollars per ton, and is used in the manufacture of sulphuric acid. Arsenic is also found mixed with the ores; but as yet has no market value. In fact, no effort has been made to save it.
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Household: Census - 1880 US Census
Name  Relation Marital Status Gender Race Age Birthplace Occupation Father's Birthplace Mother's Birthplace
 Martin WISHON-Self-Married-Male-White-age 57-KY-Retired Farmer-NC-MD  Cathrine WISHON-Wife-Married-Female-White-age49-NY-Keep House-NY-NY  
 Jane WISHON-Dau-Single-Female-White-age 22-IL- Med Student-KY-NY  
 Julia WISHON-Daughter-Single-Female-White-age 18-IL-At Home-KY-NY  
 Cora WISHON-Daughter-Single-Female-White-age 13-IL-School-KY-NY  
 Edith WISHON-Daughter-Single-Female-White-age 9-IL-School-KY-NY  

Source Information:
 Census Place Elizabeth, Jo Daviess, Illinois
  Family History Library Film   1254216
  NA Film Number   T9-0216
  Page Number   306C
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MARTIN WISHON AND CATHERINE TENYCK WISHON HAD THE FOLLOWING CHILDREN:

1) PARMELIA "PARMILECIA" WISHON BORN 7 SEP 1854/1855 IN ELIZABETH TOWNSHIP, ILLINOIS. MARRIAGE 6 MAR 1873 IN ELIZABETH TOWNSHIP, ILL. MARRIED TO JOSEPH EDWARD RICHARDS.

2) NANCY JANE WISHON BORN 25 SEPTEMBER 1858 IN JO DAVIES COUNTY, ELIZABETH, MISSOURI.

3) JULIA WISHON BORN 20 JANUARY 1862 IN JO DAVIES COUNTY, ELIZABETH, MISSOURI.

4) CORA B. WISHON BORN 16 MARCH 1867 IN JO DAVIES COUNTY, ELIZABETH, MISSOURI.

5) EDITH WISHON BORN 11 AUGUST 1871 IN JO DAVIES COUNTY, ELIZABETH, MISSOURI.

6)UNKNOWN
7)UNKNOWN
8)UNKNOWN
9)UNKNOWN
10)UNKNOWN


19. CATHERINE TENYCK

We - Wo
The Jo Daviess County ILGenWeb;  
Wishon, Catherine ElizabthVil 106B


20. THOMAS LINDSEY

BURIED IN THE GREENWOOD CEMETERY IN-West Galena Township, Illinois
Lindsey Thomas, d July 17, 1882, 59y
Lindsey Robert, d Jan 18, 1889, 34y
-------------------------------------------------------------------  Household Record  1880 United States Census  Search results
---------------------------------------------------------------------Household:
Name  Relation Marital Status Gender Race Age Birthplace Occupation Father's Birthplace Mother's Birthplace

1) Thomas LINDSEY-Self-Married-Male-White-age 57-IRELAND-Farmer-   FATHER BORN IN IRELAND-MOTHER BORN IN IRELAND-THOMAS WAS BORN 1823
2) Rebecca LINDSEY-Wife-Married-Female-White-age 50-IRELAND-Keeping   House-FATEHER BORN IN IRELAND-MOTHER BORN IN IRELAND-REBECCA 1830  
3)J. Sarah LINDSEY-Daughter-Single-Female-White-age 20-IL-Without   Occupation-FATHER IRELAND-MOTHER IRELAND-SARAH JANE BORN 1860  
4) John LINDSEY-Son-Single-Male-White-age 18-IL-Farm Laborer-   FATHER BORN IN IRELAND-MOTHER BORN IN IRELAND-JOHN BORN 1862  
5) Hamilton LINDSEY-Son-Single-Male-White-age 15-IL-Farm Laborer-   FATHER BORN IRELAND-MOTHER BORN IN IRELAND- HAMILTON BORN 1865  
6) Thomas LINDSEY-Son-Single-Male-White-age 13-IL- Attending School-   FATHER BORN IRELAND-MOTHER BORN IRELAND-THOMAS BORN 1867
7) George LINDSEY-Son-Single-Male-White-age 11-IL-Attending School-     FATHER BORN IRELAND- MOTHER BORN IRELAND- GEORGE BORN 1869  
8) Margaret LINDSEY-Daughter-Single-Female-White-age 8-IL-At Home-      FATHER BORN IRELAND-MOTHER BORN IN IRELAND-MARGARET BORN 1872  
9) Isabella LINDSEY-Daughter-Single-Female-White-age 4-IL-At Home-      FATHER BORN IN IRELAND-MOTHER BORN IN IRELAND-ISABELLA BORN 1876  
---------------------------------------------------------------------Source Information:
 Census Place Vinegar Hill, Jo Daviess, Illinois
  Family History Library Film   1254217
  NA Film Number   T9-0217
  Page Number   433A        
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Use of this site constitutes your acceptance of these Conditions of Use (last updated: 3/22/1999).
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THOMAS AND REBECCA LINDSEY HAD THE FOLLOWING CHILDREN:

1)ROBERT C. LINDSEY
2)GEORGE LINDSEY
3)HAMILTON LINDSEY
4)ISABELLA LINDSEY
5)JOHN LINDSEY
6)MARGARET LINDSEY
7)SARAH JANE LINDSEY
8)THOMAS LINDSEY
9)WILLIAM LINDSEY


21. REBECCA LINDSEY

GREENWOOD CEMETERY
West Galena Township
Lindsey Rebecca, Aug 5, 1830 - Feb 20, 1914
Hamilton, 1864 - 1918
Elizabeth, 1860 - 1912------? this may be another daughter?
Isabell, d/o T & R, Mar 19, 1904, 28y


22. THOMAS CASPER

1855 PERSONAL PROPERTY TAX FOR JO DAVIESS COUNTY
A genealogist once suggested to me to use the Personal Property Taxes to search for an ancestor. These list not only those who own real property, but the renter who only had a horse or some farm equipment. These lists were found in the back of each Township's Real Property Tax Book. Woodland Township Tax Book was not found, so the 1856 taxes were substituted. These books are now located in the Galena History Room at the Galena Public Library.

In Whose Name Listed---PP Value---Township---Delinquent Reason
Casper, Thomas          303       Guilford

(I FOUND THIS, NOT SURE IF IT ALL CONNECTS IN WITH OUR THOMAS CASPER OR NOT---I WILL PUT IT IN HERE FOR NOW AND RESEARCH IT AT A LATER TIME):
Casper, Geo.- Sec. 1; P. O. Scales Mound.
Casper, Jos. - Sec. 1; P. O. Scales Mound.
Casper, Julius - Sec. 1; P. O. Scales Mound.
Casper, Thos. - farmer; Sec. 1; P. O. Scales Mound. Born in Switzerland in 1823. Came to this County in 1841. Owns 160 acres of land. Married Julia Frick in 1849. She was born in this County in 1827. Had three children: Joseph, John and Julia. She died in March 1854. [He] married again in 1855, to Maria Getz. She was born in Germany in 1835. They have seven children: George, Emma, Elizabeth, Thomas, Barbara, Henry and Peter; lost one, Christian, died March 23, 1871. Mr. C. is serving his second term as School Director; was Overseer of Highways four years. They are members of the Lutheran Church.


24. CHARLIE PARTAIN

(THIS INFORMATION COMES FROM LANNY PARTAIN, THE SON OF CHARLES PARTAIN, MY GRANDFATHERS JOHN ALVINS PARTAINS BROTHER)

The following is from a hand-written story about my great-grandmother, Elizabeth Partain.  The account was written by my cousin Ola Fern Ford Speer (daughter of my aunt Callie Partain Ford).  I got a copy from my cousin Flossie Evans (daughter of my uncle John Partain) who received it from Ola Fern Ford Speer.  Some of the events are pretty fuzzy and some don’t agree with other accounts I have heard.  I make no judgment on the accuracy of the details, however, it is certainly very interesting and efforts have been made to validate some of the information through written records, such as census, death records and land deeds.

“Our Great Grandma Partain (Elizabeth) was ¼ Cherokee Indian. (LP Note: some accounts have her ½ Cherokee.)  It isn’t known if the Indian bloodline came from her father, or her mother.  She married our Great Grandpa, Charley Partain.  He was of French ancestry, serving as a soldier in the Confederate Army.  He was born in Sulphur Rock, Arkansas.  After the marriage, they lived in Heber Springs, Arkansas.  They had three sons: Bill, the oldest; John; and Mance (or Manson, or Sherman, as he was sometimes called.)  Great Grandma’s father lived with them.

Since Great Grandpa Partain was a soldier, he was seldom home.  Raiders, or bushwhackers, came to their home while he was away.  They destroyed everything they owned, took all their livestock, chicken, all the food, and burned the house.

There was a refugee camp for devastated families in Rolla, Missouri.  Great Grandma went there, taking her father and the three boys.  She met a wealthy merchant in Rolla by the name of Pritchett. (Some reports say he was a Union officer.)  Great Grandma became pregnant by him.  He offered to marry her if she would give up her father and her three sons.  She refused to do this.  She left Rolla, Missouri and went to Fayetteville, Arkansas.  (LP Note: if the story is true, she could only have had two sons when she left for Rolla since John was to be born after she met Pritchett and returned to Arkansas.)

At this time, Great Grandpa Charley returned to Heber Springs to see his family.  He saw the house destroyed and started searching for his family.  He searched everywhere he thought they might be, even (going) back to the Cherokee Indians to see if his wife had returned to her people.  He said he could recognize her whatever stage of age, or suffering, or whatever might have changed her appearance if he could only just see her eyes.  He could recognize her by her eyes, they were so very beautiful and so unusual.  But he never found her.  He went back to his soldier life, and was killed in battle.

The child by Pritchett was born in Fayetteville, Arkansas, December 6, 1866.  He was named John Thomas Partain, the same last name as his half brothers.

At sometime between the year of 1866 and 1876, Great Grandma Partain moved back to Independence County, Arkansas, perhaps to the town of Heber Springs, where they lived when she and Great Grandpa were married.  In the year of 1876, Great Grandma was raped by a carpetbagger by the name of Bill Fowler. (A Carpetbagger is a Northerner who settled in the Southern states at the close of the Civil War.  They got the name “Carpetbagger” from the bags made of carpet they carried their possessions in.  They were considered to be the scum of the earth.)

Great Grandma gave birth to a daughter in the year of 1877, in Independence County, Arkansas.  No city was given.  She was given the name Callie Pritchett. Great Grandma Partain died in the year 1879.  Grandpa Partain was 13 years old.  Callie Pritchett was two year old.
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Edward G. Gerdes Civil War Home Page

COMPANY B
7TH ARKANSAS CAVALRY REGIMENT CONFEDERATE STATES OF AMERICA

RECORD OF EVENTS:
30 Sep-31 Dec 1863 Camp Kirby Smith, AR. A part of the company engaged in battle at Pine Bluff about the first of Oct 1863. Capt Butts was absent north of the Arkansas River by General Price for the purpose of recruiting. He returned about the 10th of Nov 1863 with more recruits.
----------------------------------------  
PARTAIN, EZEKIEL 1Lt  - Enl 1 Jun 1863 at Clarksville, AR. Resigned and discharged 7 Nov 1863. Wagon maker.

PARTAIN, G.W. Pvt  - Enl 13 Jul 1863 at Clarksville, AR.

PARTAIN, M.B. Pvt  - Enl 31 Jan 1863 at Clarksville, AR.

PARTAIN, W.J. Pvt  - Enl 31 Jan 1863 at Clarksville, AR.

10th Regiment Arkansas Militia  Company G

This company mustered at Clarksville, Arkansas, from February 27 to March 19, 1862, with 38 men present.  Captain Andrew J. Allen was in command during this muster.  Most of these men later enlisted in regular Confederate regiments.
-------------------------------
Partain, George W—Private.  Later in Co. H, 26th Arkansas Infantry.

Partain, W J—Private.  Later in Co. B, 7th Arkansas Cavalry.


2ND ARKANSAS INFANTRY REGIMENT -  USA  COMPANY C

NAME  RANK  ENLISTMENT DATE PLACE   BIRTHPLACE  AGE  OTHER

PARTAIN, EZEKIEL (EYCHIEL) -  1 Jan 1864  Clarksville, AR - Rowan Co, NC - age  45
PARTAIN, GABRIEL G. - PVT - 1 Nov 1863  Ft Smith, AR - Scott Co, AR - age 18
------------------------------------
10th Regiment Arkansas Militia Company A

This company mustered at Clarksville, Arkansas, from February 22 to March 19, 1862, with 38 men present.  No captain was listed for this company.  First Lieutenant Ezekiel Partain was apparently in command during this muster.  Some of these men later enlisted in Co. H, 26th Arkansas Infantry.

Partain, Ezekiel—First Lieutenant.  Later in Co. B, 7th Arkansas Cavalry.

COMPANY A 4TH ARKANSAS CAVALRY REGIMENT UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

PARTAIN, WILLIAM E. Pvt  - Enl 20 Sep 1863 at Ft Smith, AR. Age 18, ht 5’ 8”, eyes hazel, hair brn, complx fair, farmer, born in Itawamba Co, MS.

ARKANSAS  CONFEDERATE AND UNION SOLDIERS  BURIAL PLACES  

PARTAIN, GABRIEL G. 2nd Ark Inf, USA  Apr 17, 1845-Dec 14, 1920 White Church (Pollard) Cemetery, Pole Co, AR

PARTON, D.L. Jone's Co, 6th Ark Inf, CSA  Interred Nov 24, 1861 Soldiers Rest, Elmwood Cemetery, Memphis, TN

COMPANY L 7TH ARKANSAS CAVALRY REGIMENT CONFEDERATE STATES OF AMERICA

RECORD OF EVENTS:

Organized in part Oct the 1st 1863 at Mount Ida, Ark. Marched to Johnson Co, Ark a distance of 125 miles. Routed through Johnson, Franklin and Crawford Counties. Skirmished with the federals on the 27th Oct. Crossed the river on the 28th marched to Center Point, Ark consolidated with another company on the 14th of November 1863 and reelected three lieutenants. The company mine was consolidated with was with Col Brooks in his raid to Keetsville, MO and in one engagement.  /s/A.D.King, Capt, Commanding

PARTAIN, SAMUEL Pvt  - Enl 12 Sep 1863 at Clarksville, AR.

COMPANY M 4TH ARKANSAS CAVALRY REGIMENT UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

PARTAIN, HOLLOWAY Pvt  - Enl 21 Feb 1864 at Ft Smith, AR. Age 39, ht 5’ 8”, eyes gray, hair brn, complx drk, farmer, born in Lauderdale Co, TN. Disch for disability 3 Feb 1865.

19TH ARKANSAS INFANTRY REGIMENT CONFEDERATE STATES OF AMERICA Not Dawson's or Dockery's     ROLL #161

ABBREVIATIONS USED: MP - Military Prison   POW- Prisoner of War

PARTAIN, F.M.  PVT- H  Captured at Stone's River, TN. (Dept of Cumberland)

"10th Regiment Arkansas Militia (Johnson County)"

The 10th Regiment Arkansas Militia—the Johnson County Militia—was part of the old prewar State militia organization, assigned to the Third Brigade, Provisional Army of Arkansas.  Upon the outbreak of the Civil War, most of men of military age enlisted in volunteer companies for Confederate service, while the old men and boys enrolled in home guard companies.  The old prewar militia companies became essentially irrelevant, and all were disbanded by 1862.  Some of the old militia regiments held one last muster, however, in the Spring of 1862.  The 10th Militia held its last annual muster at Clarksville, Arkansas, during the period February 20 to March 19, under command of Colonel John W. May, with 525 men present.  Within a few months, most of these militiamen enlisted in various Confederate regiments, particuarly the 26th Arkansas Infantry and the 4th Arkansas Cavalry.

The following rosters are taken from the July 12, 1862, payroll report of the 10th Regiment Arkansas Militia, covering the February/March muster.

Field and Staff. Company A

First Lieutentant Ezekiel Partain, 38 men present.

15th Regiment Arkansas Militia Company D Capt. B. F. Wilson

All of these men enrolled on March 10, 1862.

Partain, L—Private.

26th Arkansas Infantry. Company H.

Organized in Johnson County and enrolled in Confederate service at Clarksville on June 13, 1862, for three years or the duration of the war.

Partain, George W
Third Corporal—Enlisted at Clarksville, Arkansas, June 13, 1862; present through June 30, 1863.

COMPANY A 16TH ARKANSAS INFANTRY REGIMENT CONFEDERATE STATES OF AMERICA

PARTAIN, MATHEW Pvt -  Enl 12 Sep 1861 at Clarksville, AR. Age 19. Discharged 17 Jun 1862. In General hospital Shreveport, LA 14-23 Nov 1865.
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"Cherokee Rolls"

Dawes Commission Index 1898-1914

Search Terms: PARTAIN (4)

Results ( 4 combined matches)

Control Number: NRFF-75-53A-14650
Unit of Description: Item
Record Group Number: 75
Series ID: 53A
Item ID: 14650
Title: Enrollment for Charles H T Partain
General Materials Designator Record Type: Textual Records
Reference Unit: National Archives--Southwest Region
Agency Name: National Archives and Records Administration
Facility Name: Building 1, Dock 1
Address: 501 West Felix Street
City: Fort Worth
State: TX
Zip Code: 76115
Telephone Number: 817-334-5525
Fax Number: 817-334-5621
Organizational Code: NRFF
Creating Organization: Commissioner to the Five Civilized Tribes, Bureau of Indian Affairs.
Scope and Content: Tribe: Cherokee
Type: Minor
Age: 3
Sex: Male
Roll: 2172
Degree Indian Blood: 1/2
Census Card Number: M2047
City of Residence: SPAVINAW
Personal Name Reference: Charles H T Partain
Item Count/Item Type: item(s) |c 1
Source Project: Kiosk
View full context

Control Number: NRFF-75-53A-14651
Unit of Description: Item
Record Group Number: 75
Series ID: 53A
Item ID: 14651
Title: Enrollment for Lydia Partain
General Materials Designator Record Type: Textual Records
Reference Unit: National Archives--Southwest Region
Agency Name: National Archives and Records Administration
Facility Name: Building 1, Dock 1
Address: 501 West Felix Street
City: Fort Worth
State: TX
Zip Code: 76115
Telephone Number: 817-334-5525
Fax Number: 817-334-5621
Organizational Code: NRFF
Creating Organization: Commissioner to the Five Civilized Tribes, Bureau of Indian Affairs.
Scope and Content: Tribe: Cherokee
Type: Parent
Sex: Female
Census Card Number: M2047
Personal Name Reference: Lydia Partain
Item Count/Item Type: item(s) |c 1
Source Project: Kiosk
View full context

Control Number: NRFF-75-53A-14652
Unit of Description: Item
Record Group Number: 75
Series ID: 53A
Item ID: 14652
Title: Enrollment for Milly E Partain
General Materials Designator Record Type: Textual Records
Reference Unit: National Archives--Southwest Region
Agency Name: National Archives and Records Administration
Facility Name: Building 1, Dock 1
Address: 501 West Felix Street
City: Fort Worth
State: TX
Zip Code: 76115
Telephone Number: 817-334-5525
Fax Number: 817-334-5621
Organizational Code: NRFF
Creating Organization: Commissioner to the Five Civilized Tribes, Bureau of Indian Affairs.
Scope and Content: Tribe: Cherokee
Type: Minor
Age: 1
Sex: Female
Roll: 2173
Degree Indian Blood: 1/2
Census Card Number: M2047
City of Residence: SPAVINAW
Personal Name Reference: Milly E Partain
Item Count/Item Type: item(s) |c 1
Source Project: Kiosk
View full context

Control Number: NRFF-75-53A-14653
Unit of Description: Item
Record Group Number: 75
Series ID: 53A
Item ID: 14653
Title: Enrollment for William C Partain
General Materials Designator Record Type: Textual Records
Reference Unit: National Archives--Southwest Region
Agency Name: National Archives and Records Administration
Facility Name: Building 1, Dock 1
Address: 501 West Felix Street
City: Fort Worth
State: TX
Zip Code: 76115
Telephone Number: 817-334-5525
Fax Number: 817-334-5621
Organizational Code: NRFF
Creating Organization: Commissioner to the Five Civilized Tribes, Bureau of Indian Affairs.
Scope and Content: Tribe: Cherokee
Type: Parent
Sex: Male
Census Card Number: M2047
Personal Name Reference: William C Partain
Item Count/Item Type: item(s) |c 1
Source Project: Kiosk
--------------------------------------------------------------
Criminal Records, Fort Smith, Arkansas = 1890’s

Name Alford Partain Control number NRFF-21-3W51-35482 Key Unit File Unit Series ID 3W51 Unit ID 35482 Title Criminal Defendant Case File for Alford Partain Record Type Textual Records Start date 1893 End date Content Crime: Liquor
Jacket Number: 426 Arrangement Access Restrictions Production Reference unit National Archives--Southwest Region Agency National Archives and Records Administration Facility Building 1, Dock 1 Address 501 West Felix Street City Fort Worth State TX ZIP 76115 Voice 817-334-5525 Fax 817-334-5621 Organization NRFF Creating org United States District Court, Western District of Arkansas, Fort Smith Division.

Name H.J. Partain Control number NRFF-21-3W51-35483 Key Unit File Unit Series ID 3W51 Unit ID 35483 Title Criminal Defendant Case File for H.J. Partain Record Type Textual Records Start date 1887 End date Content Crime: Liquor
Jacket Number: 426
Also known as Parden, Jack Arrangement Access Restrictions Production Reference unit National Archives--Southwest Region Agency National Archives and Records Administration Facility Building 1, Dock 1 Address 501 West Felix Street City Fort Worth State TX ZIP 76115 Voice 817-334-5525 Fax 817-334-5621 Organization NRFF Creating org United States District Court, Western District of Arkansas, Fort Smith Division.

Name H.J. Partain Control number NRFF-21-3W51-35484 Key Unit File Unit Series ID 3W51 Unit ID 35484 Title Criminal Defendant Case File for H.J. Partain Record Type Textual Records Start date 1890 End date Content Crime: Liquor
Jacket Number: 264 Arrangement Access Restrictions Production Reference unit National Archives--Southwest Region Agency National Archives and Records Administration Facility Building 1, Dock 1 Address 501 West Felix Street City Fort Worth State TX ZIP 76115 Voice 817-334-5525 Fax 817-334-5621 Organization NRFF Creating org United States District Court, Western District of Arkansas, Fort Smith Division.

Name Joe Partain Control number NRFF-21-3W51-35486 Key Unit File Unit Series ID 3W51 Unit ID 35486 Title Criminal Defendant Case File for Joe Partain Record Type Textual Records Start date 1893 End date Content Crime: Liquor
Jacket Number: 426 Arrangement Access Restrictions Production Reference unit National Archives--Southwest Region Agency National Archives and Records Administration Facility Building 1, Dock 1 Address 501 West Felix Street City Fort Worth State TX ZIP 76115 Voice 817-334-5525 Fax 817-334-5621 Organization NRFF Creating org United States District Court, Western District of Arkansas, Fort Smith Division


25. ELIZABETH

    Since Great Grandpa Partain was a soldier, he was seldom home.  Raiders, or bushwhackers, came to their home while he was away. They destroyed everything they owned, took all their livestock, chicken, all the food, and burned the house.
    There was a refugee camp for devastated families in Rolla, Missouri. Great Grandma went there, taking her father and the three boys. She met a wealthy merchant in Rolla by the name of Pritchett. (Some reports say he was a Union officer.) Great Grandma became pregnant by him. He offered to marry her if she would give up her father and her three sons. She refused to do this. She left Rolla, Missouri and went to Fayetteville, Ar,(if the story is true, she could only have had two sons when she left for Rolla since John was to be born after she met Pritchett and returned to Ar.)
    At this time, Great Grandpa Charley returned to Heber Springs to see his family. He saw the house destroyed and started searching for his family. He searched everywhere he thought they might be, even (going) back to the Cherokee Indians to see if his wife had returned to her people. He said he could recognize her whatever stage of age, or suffering, or whatever might have changed her appearance if he could only just see her eyes. He could recognize her by her eyes, they were so very beautiful and so unusual. But he never found her.  He went back to his soldier life, and was killed in battle.
    The child by Pritchett was born in Fayetteville, Ar, December 6, 1866. He was named John Thomas Partain, the same last name as his half brothers.
    At sometime between the year of 1866 and 1876, Great Grandma Partain moved back to Independence County, Arkansas, perhaps to the town of Heber Springs, where they lived when she and Great Grandpa were married. In the year of 1876, Great Grandma was raped by a carpetbagger by the name of Bill Fowler.(A Carpetbagger is a Northerner who settled in the Southern states at the close of the Civil War. They got the name “Carpetbagger” from the bags made of carpet they carried their possessions in. They were considered to be the scum of the earth.)Elizabeth gave birth to a daughter in the year of 1877, in Independence County, Ar. No city was given.  She was given the name Callie Pritchett. Great Grandma Partain died in the year 1879. Elizabeth was 13 years old. Callie Pritchett was 2 year old.


26. ABNER WILLIAM "BILL" MAXWELL

Abner William and Nancy (Treadaway) Maxwell
Written By: May (Shull) Holloway and Joveda (Cullum) Blevins.Copy provided to TMM by: Evelyn Maxwell.[Augmented by: Tina (Maxwell) Mitchell/TMM].
  There are few known facts about Abner William Maxwell, who was born in 1820 and died August 13th 1868. It is known that the Maxwells came from Ireland and settled in Henderson County, North Carolina.
The 1850 census lists Abner Bill Maxwell and his wife, Nancy (Treadaway) Maxwell, living in Henderson County, North Carolina, along with three children ages three years to seven months. Nancy told her granddaughter, Sallie Lea Maxwell, that they did not like living in Henderson County, North Carolina so they, along with other family members, joined a large wagon train that moved from North Carolina to Arkansas around 1857.
  The Maxwells were living at Choctaw, Arkansas, [Van Buren County], when the 1860 census was taken. Abner is listed as a farmer and a carpenter, but Nancy said he also operated a blacksmith shop in Choctaw. This shop was helpful to Abner and his family during the early years of the Civil War. Since horses played a major role during the Civil War, both Union and Confederate Armies came to him for his services. He would shoe their horses without asking questions. Both sides left him alone. However, this changed in 1862 when Abner was pressured to join the Confederate Army. All horses were taken for Army use. Abner had a fine horse that was known to have only one master. When the Confederate soldiers tried to take his horse, they failed to capture him for only his master could catch him.
  On March 01, 1862, Abner went to Clinton, Arkansas and was enlisted into the Army by T.W. McCray for twelve months of service in the Confederate Army. He was described as a farmer from North Carolina, forty-two years old, with dark complexion, black hair and black eyes. He joined Company D - 31st Arkansas Infantry.
  Abner's records only record three times that he received pay for his Army service; October 31, 1862, December 31, 1862, and February 28, 1863. Cant Fugerson issued him his last pay. It is also recorded that he never received any bounty money or cummulation money. The company Muster Role for July 01, to August 31, 1863 lists him as absent with a remark "sick on retreat from Jackson, MS, supposed to be captured". Another report states he was captured July 18, 1863, near Jackson, MS. Abner was soon answering the roll call of Union Prisoners at Camp Morton in Indiana. There, he was held until the war was over. On May 22, 1865 he was released on his loyalty oath and returned to Choctaw, Arkansas where Nancy and his children were waiting for him. He was a changed man. When he enlisted in 1862 his hair and eyes were described as black. In 1865, the war record describes his eyes as hazel and his hair gray.
  Abner Bill's health weakened from his war experience. On August 13, 1868 he died and was buried in a small cemetery near the Ben Treadaway farm.
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You searched for:  Exact Spelling: Off -"The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints"; Submission Number: 451718-103199140844 [refine search] Pedigree Resource File - 17;
1. Abner Maxwell - Pedigree Resource File
Gender: M Birth/Christening: 7 Oct 1820 North Carolina, US
2. Alexander Lafayette Maxwell - Pedigree Resource File
Gender: M Birth/Christening: 29 Jan 1847 Buncombe, North Carolina, US
3. Archabold Maxwell - Pedigree Resource File
Gender: M Birth/Christening: abt 1848 North Carolina, US
4. Hanah Maxwell - Pedigree Resource File
Gender: F Birth/Christening: abt 1843 Probably North Carolina, US
5. Harriett Isabella Maxwell - Pedigree Resource File
Gender: F Birth/Christening: 18 Feb 1844 Possibly Henderson, North Carolina, US
6. Isaac Maxwell - Pedigree Resource File
Gender: M Birth/Christening: abt 1821 Probably North Carolina, US
7. J M Maxwell - Pedigree Resource File
Gender: M Birth/Christening: abt 1849 North Carolina, US
8. James Maxwell - Pedigree Resource File
Gender: M Birth/Christening: 1794 Possibly North Carolina, US
9. James Maxwell - Pedigree Resource File
Gender: M Birth/Christening: abt 1840 Probably Henderson, North Carolina, US
10. John Maxwell - Pedigree Resource File
Gender: M Birth/Christening: abt 1841 Probably North Carolina, US
11. L Michael Maxwell - Pedigree Resource File
Gender: M Birth/Christening: bet 1856 and 1857 North Carolina, US
12. Mary Matilda Maxwell - Pedigree Resource File
Gender: F Birth/Christening: 1 Oct 1853 Henderson, North Carolina, US
13. Mary Maxwell - Pedigree Resource File
Gender: F Birth/Christening: abt 1847 North Carolina, US
14. Nancy Ruth Maxwell - Pedigree Resource File
Gender: F Birth/Christening: bet 1857 and 1861 North Carolina, US
15. Samuel Maxwell - Pedigree Resource File
Gender: M Birth/Christening: 15 Apr 1818 Edneyville, Buncombe, North Carolina, US
16. William W Maxwell - Pedigree Resource File
Gender: M Birth/Christening: abt 1845 North Carolina, US
17. Mary Merrell - Pedigree Resource File
Gender: F Birth/Christening: 1796 Possibly North Carolina, US


27. NANCE VIOLA LOU TREADWAY

Abner William and Nancy (Treadaway) Maxwell

Written By:  May (Shull) Holloway and Joveda (Cullum) Blevins.
Copy provided to TMM by:  Evelyn Maxwell.
[Augmented by:  Tina (Maxwell) Mitchell/TMM].

There are few known facts about Abner William Maxwell, who was born in 1820 and died August 13th 1868.  It is known that the Maxwells came from Ireland and settled in Henderson County, North Carolina.

The 1850 census lists Abner Bill Maxwell and his wife, Nancy (Treadaway) Maxwell, living in Henderson County, North Carolina, along with three children ages three years to seven months. Nancy told her granddaughter, Sallie Lea Maxwell, that they did not like living in Henderson County, North Carolina so they, along with other family members, joined a large wagon train that moved from North Carolina to Arkansas around 1857.

The Maxwells were living at Choctaw, Arkansas, [Van Buren County], when the 1860 census was taken.  Abner is listed as a farmer and a carpenter, but Nancy said he also operated a blacksmith shop in Choctaw.  This shop was helpful to Abner and his family during the early years of the Civil War.  Since horses played a major role during the Civil War, both Union and Confederate Armies came to him for his services.  He would shoe their horses without asking questions.  Both sides left him alone.  However, this changed in 1862 when Abner was pressured to join the Confederate Army.  All horses were taken for Army use.  Abner had a fine horse that was known to have only one master.  When the Confederate soldiers tried to take his horse, they failed to capture him for only his master could catch him.  

On March 01, 1862, Abner went to Clinton, Arkansas and was enlisted into the Army by T.W. McCray for twelve months of service in the Confederate Army.  He was described as a farmer from North Carolina, forty-two years old, with dark complexion, black hair and black eyes. He joined Company D - 31st Arkansas Infantry.

Abner's records only record three times that he received pay for his Army service; October 31, 1862, December 31, 1862, and February 28, 1863.  Cant Fugerson issued him his last pay.  It is also recorded that he never received any bounty money or cummulation money.  The company Muster Role for July 01, to August 31, 1863 lists him as absent with a remark "sick on retreat from Jackson, MS, supposed to be captured".  Another report states he was captured July 18, 1863, near Jackson, MS.  Abner was soon answering the roll call of Union Prisoners at Camp Morton in Indiana.  There, he was held until the war was over.  On May 22, 1865 he was released on his loyalty oath and returned to Choctaw, Arkansas where Nancy and his children were waiting for him.  He was a changed man.  When he enlisted in 1862 his hair and eyes were described as black.  In 1865, the war record describes his eyes as hazel and his hair gray.

Abner Bill's health weakened from his war experience.  On August 13, 1868 he died and was buried in a small cemetery near the Ben Treadaway farm.  While Abner was a prisoner of war, Nancy had buried their three-year-old daughter there.  Only a concrete marker about six inches wide and twenty-four inches tall, with no information on it, was placed by his grave.  


                        Nancy
                       Wife of
                     Abner Maxwell
                  Born: Nov 8, 1828
                 As A Wife, Devoted
                As A Mother, Affectionate
                As A Friend, Kind and True
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BIOGRAPHY: While Abner was a prisoner of war, Nancy had buried their three-year-old daughter there. Only a concrete marker about six inches wide and twenty-four inches tall, with no information on it, was placed by his grave.
   Nancy Treadaway Maxwell had given birth to fourteen children before her husband left for service in the Confederate Army. Seven of the children had blue eyes and blonde hair and seven of the children had black eyes and black hair. We do not know how she fed her family while Abner Bill was away at war, or after his death.
  In the early 1890s, Nancy and eight of her children and their families moved to what is now the Davis Special Community and homesteaded a 160-acre farm. Her children helped her get established by building a Log Cabin, clearing the land and putting out a large Orchard. She was affectionately known as "Granny Maxwell", although she was only in her sixties when she moved to her homestead. Her children took good care of her. If she was ill, there were so many children and grandchildren living nearby that someone would come to stay with her. If one of her grandchildren was out of a home Granny Maxwell always welcomed them into her home.
  On August 21, 1902 she was granted a widow's War Pension. In 1905 Nancy died at age 77. The next day her son, Abner Wilkerson Maxwell, and his 15-year-old daughter, Sallie Myrtle Lea Maxwell, took her body from the Davis Special Community to Eglantine and then traveled the Old Batesville/Dover Road to Choctaw. It was a cold rainy November day. Abner and Sallie were refreshed by eating a hot meal at Ben Treadaway's home. After dinner they, and a few relatives and friends, went across a field to the small cemetery for burial. There Nancy (Treadaway) Maxwell was buried between her husband, Abner Bill, who had died in 1868 and their three year old daughter, Nancy, that she had buried in 1864 while her husband was in the Union War Prison.
Today the Army Core of Engineers has the small cemetery, which is located in the Choctaw recreation area, enclosed by a chain link fence. There are probably twenty graves in the cemetery. You can still locate most of the graves by the rocks that were placed at the graves. Tall pine trees grow through many of the graves. The Old Batesville/Dover Road is still visible. If you look close, you can still see ruts left by the many wagons that traveled the road.
In 1984 the concrete marker placed at Abner William's grave was still there, but had fallen down. The monuments placed at Nancy's grave, and her daughter's, had fallen off their base and broken into many pieces, but they were arranged to where you could read the Epitaph. It read as follows:
Nancy Wife of Abner Maxwell Born: Nov 8, 1828. As A Wife, Devoted
As A Mother, Affectionate As A Friend, Kind and True Soon after seeing them in 1984, the broken monument from the three-year-old Nancy's grave was gone. A family member wrote to W.M.C. Garner, Resident Engineer of the Core, asking that the gate to cemetery be secured so vandals could not take Nancy's monument. He replied, saying the gate had been secured and eight signs had been put, warning against vandalism.
Within a year the broken pieces of Nancy's monument were also taken. Later vandals also took the concrete slab placed as Abner's marker. Now all that is left to identify the graves are the two bases that the two Nancy's monuments sat on.
Although Abner William and Nancy (Treadaway) Maxwell were not known for fame or for fortune, they did leave to Van Buren County, Arkansas, a family that has continued to serve their country well. You may find one of their descendants in many honorable positions throughout the nation.
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ALWAYS LOVE ONE ANOTHER; IT'S THE ONLY THING THAT REALLY MATTERS.


28. ELI WATSON

 SOME RECORDS SHOW HE WAS BORN IN 1808 and 1809. ANOTHER ONE FROM PAPERS THAT READ "ATCHISON COUNTY CEMETERY LISTINGS-ATCHISON, KANSAS: ELI WASTON WAS BORN 1809, AND THAT HE DIED ON 3-1-1889, IT ALSO SAY'S THAT ELI WAS 79 YEARS 2 MONTHS 25 DAYS OLD, AND THT HE IS BURIED IN OLD HURON CEMETERY.
  ELI WATSON WAS ONE OF THE FOUNDERS OF LANCASTER, KANSAS.
  A LETTER FROM THE "INDIANA HISTORICAL SOCIETY" DATED AUG 22, 1997 TO RAY WATSON OF OXNARD, CA. IN REGUARDS TO ELI WATSON OF HENDRICKS COUNTY IS THAT HE SERVED AS CONSTABLE IN WASHINGTON TOWNSHIP. HENDRICKS COUNTY, IN 1834. YOU CAN SEARCH MORE IN THE 1850 MISSOURI CENSUS AND THE KANASAS 1860 CENSUS FOR MORE INFORMATION.
  OLD HURON WAS PLATTED IN THE 1850'S AND WAS LOCATED ON THE TRAIL FROM LANCASTER TO KENNEKUK. THE TOWN WAS LOCATED 14 MILES NORTHWEST OF ATCHISON AND SEVEN MILES NORTH OF MONROVIA. IT WAS THE NEAREST RAILROAD TOWN, WHICH WAS THE CENTRAL BRANCH THAT RAN FROM ATCHISON THROUGH MONROVIA TO WATERVILLE, A DISTANCE OF 100 MILES. THE RAILROAD WAS STARTED IN 1864 AND COMPLETED IN 1868.
  THE FIRST SIGN OF THE TOWN WAS THE CEMETERY. THE GRAVES WERE MEMBERS FROM A WAGON TRAIN BURIED IN 1855. ABOUT A HALF MILE FROM THE CEMETERY WAS A GOVERNMENT WELL THAT SUPPLIED WATER FOR THE COMMUNITY AND TRAVELERS.
  THE FIRST POST OFFICE WAS STARTED ON DECEMBER 14, 1857, AND WAS LOCATED WEST ACROSS THE CREEK ON THE GRIMES PLACE. THE FIRST IN ATCHISON COUNTY. THE MAIL WAS DELIVERED BY STAGE COACH EACH DAY. LATER POSTMASTERS WERE ED SNOW, JIM LEWIS, BILL BROWN, ELI WATSON (OUR GREAT-GREAT GRANDPA)AND H. J. WATSON (HUGH J. HIS BROTHER).
  ROBERT COOK OWNED A GROCERY STORE ON THE WEST END OF HURON ROAD. HE WAS ALSO A POSTMASTER.
  THE MASONIC LODGE WAS ORGANIZED IN 1868. THE FIRST HELD MEETINGS AT NELS CHALFANT'S HOME AND LATER MOVED TO THE UPPER STORY OF COOK'S GROCERY. IT WAS MOVED TO NEW HURON IN 1883.
  THE FIRST SCHOOL IN OLD HURON WAS BUILT IN 1865, ON THE SOUTH SIDE OF HURON ROAD ABOUT A HALF MILE FROM THE CEMETERY. THE FIRST TEACHER WAS H. B. KELLEY.
  DR. W. D. JONES WAS THE FIRST DOCTOR.
  THE BETHEL METHODIST CHURCH WAS LOCATED ONE MILE WEST OF HURON. IT WAS BUILT IN 1870 AND USED UNTIL 1915. THE REV. H. I. MILLER WAS THE FIRST PASTOR. THE TOWNSITE OF THE PRESENT DAY HURON WAS ORIGINALLY THE PROPERTY OF COL. D. R. ANTHONY OF LEAVENWORTH. ANTHONY DONATED THE RAILROAD COMPANY 20 ACRES OF LAND AND THE RIGHT-OF-WAY FOR ONE MILE. THE TOWN WAS NAMED AND PLATTED ON MAY 18, 1882.
  BY THE END OF THE FIRST YEAR, THERE WERE OVER 50 DWELLINGS IN THE TOWN. AMONG THE FIRST ERECTED WERE THE PRESBYTERIAN AND BAPTIST CHURCHES WITH ANTHONY DONATING THE LOTS ON WHICH THEY WERE BUILT.
  HURON IS AN INDIAN NAME AND WAS NAMED AFTER THE ORIGINAL TOWN OF OLD HURON.
  THE FIRST BANK OPENED SEPT. 15, 1891 WITH W. C. MCCLAIN AS CASHIER. THE BANK WAS SOLD TO CHARLES SMITH IN 1904.
  HURON WAS REPRESENTED BY 19 NEWSPAPERS FORM MARCH 13, 1884 TO NOV. 1, 1917 WHEN THE LAST ISSUE OF THE HURON HERALD WAS SOLD. R. E. MCBRIDE, EDITOR, CLOSED THE PAPER AND MOVED TO EVEREST WHERE HE PUBLISHED THE EVEREST ENTERPRISE.
  THE FIRST SCHOOLHOUSE OF DIST. #44 WAS BUILT THREE QUARTERS OF A MILE WEST AND HALF MILE SOUTH OF HURON. THIS BUILDING WAS MOVED TO NEW HURON AND LOCATED IN THE NORHT PART OF TOWN. IT ALTER BECAME A HOTEL AND THEN A RESIDENCE. IN 1892 A NEW BUILDING WAS BUILT ON THE ANTHONY FARM. THE PRINCIPAL WAS FRANK CLASS AND THE TEACHER, MAGGIE MCCLINTOCK.
  IN 1929 THE HURON RURAL HIGH SCHOOL WAS BUILT. THE FIRST CLASS TO GRADUATE WAS IN 1930 AND THE LAST 1955.
  HURON'S BIGGEST FIRE OCCURED ON NOVEMBER 15, 1884, WHEN 18 BUILDINGS ON THE SOUTH SIDE OF MAIN STREET BURNED.
  IN 1904, THE TELEPHONE WAS STARTED AND LINES BUILT. THEN IN 1954, THE PHONE COMPANY SOLD TO RAINBOW TELEPHONE AND A DIAL SYSTEM WAS PUT TO USE IN 1957.
  OVER THE YEARS HURON HAS HAD 23 GROCERIES, 17 LUMBER YARDS, 27 GRAIN DEALERS, 11 HARDWARE DEALERS, 1O BLACKSMITHS, 21 CAFES, FIVE HARNESS SHOPS, EIGHT LIVERY STABLES AND SIX DOCTORS.
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ATCHISON NATIVE KELLY VANDYKE WOULD LIKE TO HEAR FROM THE HOME FOLKS. IF YOU HAVE GERMAN RESEARCH, KELLY MIGHT BE ABLE TO HELP. HIS ADDRESS:

THOMAS J. (KELLY) VanDYKE
MATH DEPARTMENT UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND
52 MSSQ
PSC 9, BOX 3107
APO AE 09123
TELEPHONE/FAX 06561-12063
METZWIESCHEN 3
54634 BITBURG
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ELI WATSON AND HANNAH GRACE SMITH HAVE THE FOLLOWING CHILDREN:

1)HEZAKIAH MASON WATSON BORN 26 SEPTEMBER 1848 IN HURON, KANSAS, MARRIED ON 2 FEBRUARY 1881 TO MARY FRANCIS HENDRICK. HEZAKIAH DIED ON 4 FEBRUARY 1917 IN MUSKOGEE, OKLAHOMA AND IS BURIED THERE.

2)HUGH JACKSON WATSON BORN 6 MARCH 1841 IN INDIANA, MARRIED ON 17 MARCH 1864 TO CYNTHIA ANN ELIOTT, HUGH DIED 24 MAY 1918, WAS BURIED ON 26 MAY 1918 IN OLD HURON.

3)JAMES M. WATSON BORN 1833 IN BUCHANAN, MISSOURI, MARRIED ON 16 MARCH 1865 TO SARAH M. SMITH, HAMES DIED 9 MARCH 1912.

4)JOHN W. WATSON BORN 1837 IN INDIANA.

5)MARY CATHARINE WATSON BORN 1843 IN BUCHANAN, MISSOURI, MARRIED ON 7 FEBRUARY 1860 IN ATCHISON COUNTY TO WILLIAM H. HARDIN.

6)ELIZA J. WATSON BORN 1852 IN MISSOURI.

7)ELISHA L. WATSON BORN 1855 IN RUSH, BUCHANAN, MISSOURI.

8)ELIJAH L. WATSON BORN 1845 IN ATCHISON COUNTY, KANSAS, MARRIED ON 7 JANUARY 1874 TO JENNIE ELLIOTT.


30. GEORGE WASHINGTON HEDRICK

  DURNING THE GOLD RUSH 3 TO 4 WAGON TRAINS LOADED WITH MEN DROVE THROUGH, TOOK THEM ABOUT 6 MONTHS. MANY MEN DIED ALONG THE WAY. LOUIS WAS ONE OF THEM THAT DIED WHILE TRAVELING WITH THE WAGON TRAIN TO CALIFORNIA. HIS WIFE RACHEL AND CHILDREN STAYED BEHIND IN THEIR HOME IN SHIBLEYS POINT, MO. SHE LATER REMARRIED TO A. L. HUPP. GEORGE "LOUIS" AND RACHEL HAD THREE CHILDREN: MARY FRANCIS, LOUISA ELIZABETH AND MARGARET MARINDATH HEDRICK.
  MY AUNT FLOSSIE PARTAIN EVANS (DAUGHTER OF JOHN ALVIN PARTAIN) GAVE ME STORIES THAT HAVE BEEN HAD WRITTEN BY MARGARET MARINDATH HEDRICKS DAUGHTER, NELLIE JOHNSON-LEMON) SHE TELLS STORIES ABOUT HER FAMILY, WHICH I (NANCY PARRY) WILL PUT IN UNDER HER GRANDFATHER, SO THEY WILL PRINT OUT ON EVERY ONE'S BOOK. IF YOU WANT MORE OF THESE STORIES, SEE ONE OF THE EVAN'S THEY WILL HAVE A COPY. (THESE ARE HER WORDS).
  I WAS A VERY SENSITIVE CHILD AND THE SAME AS I GREW OLDER. MY FEELINGS GOT HURT EASY AND CRIED OVER EVERYTHING. I HAD THIS DREAM ABOUT MY FATHER (DADE JOHNSON) ONE NIGHT. THAT SOMEONE HAD PUT MY PAPA'S HEAD ON TOP OF OUR CLOTHESLINE POLE AND WAS POUNDING IT WITH A BUTTER PADDLE. FOR MOTHS I WAS SURE THAT HAD REALLY HAPPENED.
  I WOULD LIKE TO HAVE YOU GO WITH ME TO THE FIRST HOME I REMEMBER, THE OLD FARM. IT WAS AN OLD-FASHIONED "T" HOUSE WITH A BIG UPSTAIRS, TWO FRONT GABLED WINDOWS AND A BIG FRONT PORCH. HOW MUCH FUN I HAD PLAYING ON THE PORCH. I HAVE A PHOTOGRAPH WHERE I HAVE MY DOLL CARRIAGE OUT THERE. WE HAD AN ICE HOUSE, BARN, SHEEPSHED, GOOSE HOUSE AND OF COURSE HOG PENS AND ALL THAT GOES WITH A FAR. THE GOOSE HOUSE WAS REAL NICE, A LOG HOUSE WITH A PARTITION IN IT. I CLEANED OUT PART OF IT AND USED IT FOR A PLAYHOUSE. I THINK THE ROOD WAS COVERED WITH CANE OR FODDER OF SOME KIND. I HAD A PET CROW BUT IT WAS SO NOISY I FINALLY TURNED IT LOOSE.
  MY AUNT MARY FRANCIS HEDRICK-WATSON AND MY MOTHER MARGARET WERE VERY CLOSE AND THEY SENT A LOT OF TIME AT EACH OTHER'S HOMES. THIS ONE DAY MY AUNT MARY WAS OVER AND THEY WERE ALL OUT BUTCHERING HOGS. MY MAMA SENT MY SISTER DAISY ACROSS THE FIELD TO TAKE THEM A BIG KNIFE. DAISEY HAD OTHER THINGS TO CARRY AND SHE LOST THE KNIFE. OF XOURSE MAMA WOULD SCOLD HER WHEN SHE THOUGHT OF IT AND WHEN SHE DIDN'T I WOULD SAY, "SHAME ON DAISY, LOST THE BUTCHER KNIFE," WHICH WOULD BRING IT UP FRESH AGAIN. (MOST OF THESE STORIES I WILL NOT PUT IN, BUT SHE WAS ALWAYS GETTING HER SIBLINGS IN TROUBLE. BUT THEN AGAIN THEY WERE ALWAYS TEASING AND SCARING HER TO MAKE HER TATTLE).
  MY PAPA WAS MY IDEAL. HE NEVER WHIPPED ME AND I CAN'T REMEMBER THAT HE EVER SCOLDED ME SO HE WAS PRETTY SPECIAL. ONE DAY WHEN I WAS ABOUT FIVE YEARS OLD A LADY CAME BY SELLING PICTURES. ONE WAS A BIG ROOSTER. SHE SAID, "IS THIS YOUR PPA?' HOW MAD I WAS! THE IDEA OF HER THINKING MY PAPA LOOKED LIKE THAT WAS MORE THAN I COULD TAKE. MY FATHER WORE A MUSTACHE AND BEARD. I ASKED SOMEONE WHY HE HAD THEM. THEY SAID HE WAS JUST SO UGLY HE HAD TO. THEY'LL NEVER KNWO HOW THAT HURT ME. ONCE HE HAD HIS PICTURE TAKEN AT STAHL ON HIS STORE PORCH UPSTAIRS. THERE WERE NO DOORS AND THE WINDOWS WERE CLOSED AS THE PICTURE SHOWED. I JUST COULDN'T FIGURE HOW HE GOT UP THERE--NO LADDER TOBE SEEN. I ASKED SOMEONE AND THEY SAID,"OH, THEY KICKED HIM THROUGH THE WINDOW." I THOUGHT , POOR PAPA.
  IN THOSE DAYS THE ROADS WERE SO MUDDY AND THE CLAY SO STICKY FOR SO LONG AFTER A RAIN. IF THE OLD-TIMERS OF THOSE YEARS COULD COME BACK AND SEE OUR HIGHWAYS IT WOULD BE HARD FOR THEM TO BELIEVE. WHEN I WAS QUITE SMALL MY MAMA'S HALF-BROTHER UNCLE ENOCH BURNS PASSED AWAY IN STERLING, KANASAS. THE BODY WAS BROUGHT BY WAGON FROM UNIONVILLE TO HARTFORD FOR BURIAL. ALTHOUGH IT WASN'T VERY FAR THE ROADS WERE SO MUDDY AND THEY WERE SO LONG ON THE ROAD THAT NIGHT CAME AND THE BODY WAS KEPT AT A FARM HOME FOR THE NIGHT.
  I USED TO GO AND STAY A WEEK AT A TIME WITH MY AUNT LOUISA. THEIR HOME WAS SO DEAR. EVERY NIGHT THEY HAD RELIGIOUS SERVICES, TAKING TURNS READING THE SCRIPTURE LESSON AND SAYING THE PRAYER. THEY SANG SO MUCH AND HAD SEVERAL SONG BOOKS COVERED WITH OIL CLOTH. ONE SONG IN PARTICULAR I REMEMBER WAS "WAY OVER IN THE PROMISED LAND". SOMETIMES WE ATTENDED CHURCH AT THE BRADSHAW SCHOOL HOUSE. AUNT MAY WATSON'S FOLKS CAME BY IN THE WAGON WITH GRANDMA HUPP SITTING ON A CANE BOTTOMED CHAIR.
  PAPA LATER ON SOLD THIS STORE THEN PUT IN ANOTHER STORE WITH WALL PAPER, PAINTS, A SODA FOUNTAIN AND ICE CREAM. IT WAS DURNING PROHIBITION AND HE NAMED IT THE "COLD WATER DRUG STORE". IT COST US A LOT OF WORK FOR THE MINUTE THEY CAME INTO THE STORE THEY WENT TO WHERE WE KEPT THE COLD WATER. HE HAD HIS LETTERHEADS PRINTED "IF I GET LOST TAKE ME BACK TO UNCLE DADE'S, LEMONVILLE, MISSOURI. IT BECAME FAMOUS ALL OVER. EVEN THE DRUG COMPANIES HAD A CONTEST FOR THE BEST RHYME ABOUT UNCLE DADE'S COLD WATER DRUG STORE.
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GEORGE WASHINGTON HEDRICK AND RACHEL BALLA BURNS HAD THE FOLLOWING CHILDREN:

1) MARY FRANCIS HEDRICK BORN 21 SEPTEMBER 1853 IN HARTFORD PUTMAN COUNTY, MISSOURI. SHE MARRIED ON 2 FEBRUARY 1881 TO HEZAKIAH MASON WATSON. MARY DIED ON 19 DECEMBER 1931 IN SPIRO, OKLAHOMA. SHE IS BURIED IN NEW HOPE CEMETRY IN SPIRO, OKLAHOMA.

2) MARGARET MARINDATH HEDRICK BORN 1855 AND DIED 25 APRIL 1933 IN SPIRO, LEFLORE COUNTY, OKLAHOMA, SHE MARRIED A MAN BY THE NAME OF DADE JOHNSON.

3) LOUISA ELIZABETH HEDRICK BORN 13 JULY 1843 IN NEOACSHA. KANSAS, MARRIED TO SILAS WILSON HAYNES ON 27 MARYCH 1864 IN HARTFORD PUTMAN COUNTY, MISSOURI. LOUISA DIED ON 19 MARCH 1936 IN NEOACSHA, KANSAS.


31. RACHEL BALLA BURNS

  LOUIS DIED WHILE TRAVELING WITH WAGON TRAIN TO CALIFORNIA. HIS WIFE RACHEL AND CHILDREN STAYED BEHIND IN THEIR HOME IN SHIBLEYS POINT, MO. SHE LATER REMARRIED TO A. L. HUPP.
  RACHEL WOULD GO TO VISIT AND STAYED AWILE WITH HER CHILDREN AFTER SHE MARRIED HUPP. SHE SMOKED A PIPE AND HER GRAND-DAUGHTER NELLIE JOHNSON PESTERED HER CONSTANTLY TO SEE IF SHE DIDN'T WANT TO SMOKE SO SHE COULD LIGHT HER PIPE.
  NELLIE TELLS A STORY ABOUT HER GRANDMOTHER RACHEL HUPP, THAT SHE WORE FOR UNDDIES, AN OPEN "SHIMMY". SHE WAS QUITE STIFF WITH RHEUMATISM. BEFORE BEDTIME SHE WOULD GO OUTSIDE AND NEVER DID I FAIL TO ASK, "GRANDMA, WHERE ARE YOU GOING?" SHE WOULD SAY JUST TO LOOK AROUND. I WATCHED AND SHE NEVER SAT DOWN ONCE. I THOUGHT IF GRANDMA COULD GO POTTY STANDING UP I COULD, BUT IT DIDN'T WORK OUT RIGHT FOR ME.
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Household Record  1880 United States Census  Search results
---------------------------------------------------------------------Household:----NOT SURE IF THIS IS THEM--BIRTH DATES ARE OFF!
Name  Relation Marital Status Gender Race Age Birthplace Occupation Father's Birthplace Mother's Birthplace

Rachel HUPP-Self-Widow-Female-White-age 63-KY-Keeps House-KY-KY-1817  
Enoch A. HUPP-Son-Single-Male-White-age 21-MO-Farming-KY-KY-1859  
Mary HEADRICK-Dau-Single-Female-White-age 22-MO-MO-KY-1858  
---------------------------------------------------------------------Source Information:
 Census Place Elm, Putnam, Missouri
  Family History Library Film   1254711
  NA Film Number   T9-0711
  Page Number   462C