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Ancestors of NANCY SUE RICHARDS

Notes


52. JAMES "JIMMY" MAXWELL

---------------------------------------------------------------------Jimmie MAXWELL (AFN: 2TFQ-X0)  Pedigree
 Sex:  M Family  
---------------------------------------------------------------------Event(s):
 Birth: 7 Oct 1794, Sc
 Death: 15 Mar 1874/1876, Hend Co, Nc
 Burial:, Hend Co, Nc
---------------------------------------------------------------------Parents:
 Father:  Andrew MAXWELL SR (AFN: 2TFQ-MF)  Family  
 Mother:  Jane UNK (GREEN) (AFN: 2TFQ-NL)   
    Father:   Family  
---------------------------------------------------------------------Marriage(s):
 Spouse:  Mary MERRILL (AFN: BQPP-BM)  Family  
 Marriage:
---------------------------------------------------------------------Husband's Name
 Jimmie MAXWELL (AFN:2TFQ-X0)  Pedigree  
 Born:  7 Oct 1794  Place: Sc
 Died:  15 Mar 1874/1876  Place: Hend Co, Nc
 Buried: Place: Hend Co, Nc
  Father:  Andrew MAXWELL SR (AFN:2TFQ-MF)  Family  
  Mother:  Jane UNK (GREEN) (AFN:2TFQ-NL)   
---------------------------------------------------------------------Wife's Name
 Mary MERRILL (AFN:BQPP-BM)  Pedigree  
 Born:  6 Feb 1796  Place:  
 Died:  20 Mar 1866  Place:   
  Father:  John MERRILL SR (AFN:3QSP-5T)  Family  
  Mother:  Katherine Mary UNK (AFN:QL01-K2)   
---------------------------------------------------------------------Children
---------------------------------------------------------------------1.  Sex  Name  
 M  Samuel MAXWELL "SAMBO" (AFN:2DMK-4V)  Pedigree  
 Born:1818 Place:  Edneyville, Henderson Co., Nc  
 Died: Place: Fairview, Buncombe Co., Nc
---------------------------------------------------------------------


62. ROBERT P. BURNS

THIS INFORMATION CAME FROM "THE CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS".
  FILM OR FICHE NUMBER 1000372  Film/fiche search results Index to births, early to 1900  New Hampshire. Registrar of Vital Statistics. 1 title matching the film number.
BATCH #754001-SOURCE CALL #1000372.
  Topic
New Hampshire - Vital records - Indexes
  Titles
Bride's index, 1640-1900 / New Hampshire. Division of Vital Statistics, Card file index to publishments of marriage intention prior to 1900 / New Hampshire Historical Society Index to births, early to 1900 / New Hampshire. Registrar of Vital Statistics
Index to deaths, early to 1900 / New Hampshire. Registrar of Vital Statistics
© 2002 Intellectual Reserve, Inc. All rights reserved.
IGI Individual Record FamilySearch™ International Genealogical Index v5.0
North America Search Results Event(s):
 Birth:  12 DEC 1792   Nottingham West Twp, Hillsboro, New Hampshire
Source Information:
Batch No.: Dates: Source Call No.: Type: Printout Call No.: Type:  
7540011 1000372 Film NONE    
Sheet: 00 ---------------------------------------------------------------------
© 1999-2002 by Intellectual Reserve, Inc.  All rights reserved.  English approval: 3/1999
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This is a copy of a manuscript which was compiled by: Jacob Ernest Burns, (Nancy Parry has re-typed it as written-these are not my stories, some of them were very hard to follow and I couldn't make heads or tails out of due to typing on his part.  I did not add these. This was sent to me from my Aunt Flossie Partain-Evans, which she received it from another family member that it had been passed down to). It contains many typos and errors but has some good information and is good reading. Jacob Ernest Burns has a hand-written later that reads: At last! There were some mistakes I have tried to correct, you will see that every other page is blank so each of you can correct or add to just as they wish. I hope you will not be disappointed. It is a task off my hands and mind. Best of luck and happiness. J. E. Burns. J. E. Burns in Hannibal, Mo, incidental notes, has written this History on Robert P. Burns and Louisa Balla-Burns with. On July 1845. He was hoping by passing this on that some day it would be published into a book.

Robert P. Burns,
   He was a native of North Ireland. I understand his given name was Robert which may indicate he was of Scotch descent but the fact he was Catholic is better proof, for North Ireland. He immigrated to America before the Revolutionary War and settled in Maryland, which was sanctuary for immigrant Catholics.
  When the Mexican War broke out Robert Burns was commissioned a Caption but the war closed before his company reached the boarder. He ran a blacksmith shop in New London for some time and later moved to a farm near Salt River. Robert was very much Irish, but he did not speak broken. He had to make horse shoe nails from small bars bought for that purpose. After making the nails he would bend each one around the point of the horn of the anvil, then when they cooled he would straighten them out. When asked why he bent the nails his answer was almost invariably being, "To keep the chickens and ducks from swallowing them". The real reason of course was to test the metal to be sure there were no slivers or flaws. The burns family were all of medium size height and weight, no one was extremely short or tall, thin or fat. The entire Burns family had eyes the shade of blue, none were real brunettes, and (I take it that they were blonde).
  Robert was born in Maryland on October 20, 1792. When he was very small the family moved to Virginia, locating in Loudun County, not far from Alexandria. His father, who was a farmer, died when Robert was but a lad. He remembered of the Priest being there and of the candles burning. I understand he made his home with some of the relatives when he was fifteen years old (1807) he came to Kentucky with his brother, Nicholas. They located near Shaprsburg, Bath County, (then Montgomery County), and engaged in overland freighting from Ohio River points to the interior on the licking River section.
   There is record of Burns living in Montgomery County and of Ballas living in Botetourt County (but one county between) in southwestern Virginia at the same (time) date. There is record of John Balla in Botetourt County who was a Revolutionary War soldier, April 8, 1779 to May 11, 1780. Also, a John Balla who was a Justices of the Peace in the same county in 1791, Evidently the same person. I find the names of Balla, Bally, Balarr and Ballar in Virginia records.
  The tax book of Bath County, Kentucky for the year 1816 shows: Robert Burns with 3 horses. Dennis Burns, 72 across on Flat Creek, which had been originally entered, surveyed and patented in the name of George Balla (from whom Burns no doubt bought it). Mary Balla 190? Across on Flat Creek, which had been originally entered, surveyed and patented in the name of George Balla (Mary must have been his widow).
  Bath County formed from Montgomery County in 1811. Montgomery from Clark County in 1796 Clark County was formed in 1792.
  His family moved to Kentucky when he was a boy and he married there in the year of 1813 or 1814 to Lousisa Balla. Later they moved to Shuteye Creek, Missouri in 1820, and Rally County. (Later I will tell you the story how the town got it's name "Shuteye Creek"). Robert was registered as a voter on the poll-books for the first state election in August of 1822. They traveled by groups in wagon train and then spread out selecting the spot of land in the wide-open space that suited them. Robert choice this one spot, it was perfect for his family, It was near Shibley's point, where his brother Enoch settled about 8-10 miles away from them. Shuteye Creek from where it empties into Charitan River, just north of where Ninevah was. Some of them built fences around their land. Very few farmers were on the ridges and they usually were alone. The settlements on the Spring Creek, South of Shuteye and on Brush Creek and Blackbird, north were much the same.
  Robert picked his spot of land that would be most suitable for him and his family to farm. They dug a well for their fresh water. Streams and water with waterfalls flowed near by. Both spring water was easy to get to and fresh water streams where there was plentiful fish to go around. The men hunted the wild animals, which Lousisa cooked up. The land was plentiful and animals were wild all around them. There were deer, turkey, bears, pheasants, quail, wild or passenger pigeons, opossum's and prairie chickens. Plums grew all over. The crabapple was utilized, as were persimmon, paw-paw and wild grapes. There were red and black haw (? Not sure what that is). Blackberries and gooseberries were plentiful. The shellbark hickory-nut, black walnut, butternut and hazelnut could be stored in bushels that grew wild. They used dozen kinds of roots, herbs and barks for seasoning and medicine. A great variety of grain and vegetables were raised on the good rich land. They made there own supply of molasses and maple syrup; wild bees with stores of wild honey were plentiful.
  They built a two-room log house with a fireplace. A frame room was added to one end to extend the living size later. The cabin was built without nails. The logs were put in place and notched at the corners, to make them lay firm and fuse together. Wedging in bits of spilt timber filled in the spaces between the logs. Then they plastered the outside and in with mud made clay. The roof was of clapboard riveted made out of large trees, usually 2 to 3 feet long about ˝ inch thick and 6 to 8 inches wide. Laid on log girders then weighted down with logs laid on top of them. The fireplace was built in at one end as the house made of halves of logs about the same size as those as used in the wall. This space was about 2 or 3 feet deep by 5 to 7 feet wide. Inside of this rock was walled up and mortared with clay mud. Then on top of this outside of the house wall, was built a chimney. It was built above the fireplace by using gradually shorter pieces until the main top part would be only about 16 to 18 inches one way and 24 to 30 inches the other way. Then all were plastered with mud clay. It was surprising how long a wooden fireplace and chimney could be used without damage of catching on fire. It frequently had to be "re-dubbed" as it was called. The floor of the cabin was made of puncheon. These were broad boards made by splitting large tree trunks into pieces 2 to 4 inches thick and hune (tool) on one side with a broadax then laid down on the house sleepers. Which were logs reaching from one side of the house to the other side, As to make all lay smooth on the topside. The doors were made of wood, with a latch string that hung out to open and close it with, the door was fastened from the outside entrance of the house. This was used to extend a welcome invitation. By pulling the string inside, the door was fastened from the outside entrance. The windows were a hole made by cutting a portion of a wall or log for a space of 3 or 4 feet. They used animal skin or leather to cover the windows, but during the winter months the windows were covered with wood to keep the cold out.
   On the south door of the living room was a noon mark. By taking a mariner's compass on a sunshiny day and watching the shadow of the door jam on one side of the door, then when the shadow fell directly north, make a slight saw out or other permanent mark at the edge of the shadow on the door sill. This would tell us it was 12 noon and we would set our clock by it. We had a Dutch oven that we used for cooking.
  Schooling and education was something very strong in their household. Reading, writing and ciphering were their main subjects, Robert was always called upon for assistance by others less fortunate. One winter he employed a tutor to come to his home and teach his family during the cold months. They used one room for study and class work. He boarded the man and gave him a horse that was valued at about $100.00.
  Robert had several strands of wild bees lined up along the yard fence. Wild bees do not wait for you to get in their way to sting you, they hunt you up. They seem to attack you in gangster gangs. There were English smartweeds that had grown up around in the neighborhood of these bees. They had grown 3 to 4 feet high and had long red tassels like blossoms. Some call them turkey snout flowers. If you went out to pick those flowers you better do it fast and run or you're the bees target.
  In his later years Robert suffered from rheumatism for years and he walked with crutches. He wore his hair and beard both somewhat long and they were snow-white. He did not have a real heavy beard. He was fair complicated and had perfect blue eyes. Eventually he had become a specimen of that perfect rugged and active pioneer-manhood. He was not a man to get ruffled, his laughter was real and he joked a lot, a wonderful man. Lavishes friendship and plenty to exercise that freedom. In short, he lived and let lived. He made no suggestions, and took none. He was a blacksmith and a landowner to the very last. He was frugal, charitable and always interested in school. He took no part in reckless financial projects or stormy polities but always exercised his right of franchise. He was not disliked by anyone. His belief was "All men are born free and equal", and believed all fellowmen had a freedom of his own.
  A log cabin school house was built near their home it was called "Round Top School House", the top was not round but slopped up to at the sides from all four corners.  Near both the school and our house was a big tree, Robert called it the "Old Eagle Tree" and liked to show it off to all the grandkids. I t was tall and stood very straight, it was a cottonwood tree. Eagles had nested and lived high up in its branches.
  This is the story on how the town "Shuteye Creek" got it's name: The county has plenty hornets, wasps, yellow-jackets and wild bees. Individuals traveled through on horseback. Two men were passing through when one got stung on the face by a wasp. By the time they reached this creek his eye were swollen shut, they stopped to let their horses drink and dubbed the stream, Shuteye Creek!
   Robert had two tracts of land. One where he first settled, he purchased from a Mr. True, I think. Then later was where he lived and continued to live excepting for a short time when he and Louisa made their home with Uncle Joe. Here is where he died. This was on the place where he first settled. The first tracts were only a short distance apart. They were called "Track housing".
  A Mr. White and his sons built a saw and gristmill at Shibleys Point sometime before the Civil War, which they also developed into the first, flowering (flouring) mill for long distances around. Settlers came for two or three days drive and camped all around while waiting for their grist to be ground. Most of the shafts, both horizontal and vertical, 8 to 10 inches in diameter and power wheels were made of wood. One vertical shaft reached form the first floor to the third floor of the three-story building. There was a long hog house where they kept hogs fattening on the by-products of the mill. There was also a carding machine in operation at this point.
   Troublesome Indians along the Mississippi as far north as Ralls county and along the Missouri for some distance had been pushed back before the Blackhawk war in 1832. This was about the time of the first permanent settlement anywhere near the Iowa State line and as Far West as the Chariton River. After the Shuteye settlement was started Indians from the north came to and near the settlement on their annual fall hunts. They frequently used the same camping ground each year. One such camp site was down the creek a mile or so from Robert's son Enoc's claim and up the creek from Robert's that far or nearly so. The creek runs near the highland, on the south and at this place and on this slope of ridge, the camp was located. These particular Indians used a kind of matting of sattail flags to cover wigwams of temporary structure. I do not know from what tribe they were. The Blackhawk war had disturbed and scattered various Indian settlements so that many were not more than roving bands drifting to new locations. The Iowa's are a part of the Dakota's Federation, which are now in Kansas and Oklahoma. The Sax and Fox scattered and are now in Iowa and Kansas and Oklahoma. So these Indians must have been from their source. They would allow settlers to come into their camp and ask favors of the settlers. A small band camped near Robert's for a day or so. One of the squaws came to the house and after considerable mumbling and sign making enabled Louisa to understand that she wanted salt. The squaw never brought anything to carry the salt back in. Indians never borrow or loan. The just ask for what they want and give, when ask to return. Louisa knew that to give her a cup of pan would mean "All Gift", so she gathered up one corner of the squaw's apron, such as it might be called and placed the salt in it and bringing the side all up around and tied the apron closed. This squaw had not been gone long when two or three other squaw's came to the house holding out a corner of their aprons, without mumbling anything. That was sufficient. She gave them salt in the same manner and all went well.
  Another day on the farm, some Indians on a hunt crippled a deer near by at the creek. Their hounds were pursuing it. The deer had run into a water hole in the creek. Deer do this for protection. They tried and tried to get their dogs to swim in and force the deer out but to no avail. A crippled deer or one hemmed up was dangerous. The Indians finally came to the house and asked Robert if he would bring his dogs down and try to get the deer out. He was busy and his dogs would not follow a stranger. So, Robert said, "Johnny (that was one of his son's) can take them". Away they went. Robert knew his dogs too and it seemed that the chance for a catch was slim. Johnny's little "Fiste" was not among the other dogs when he took them to the creek but when he heard the commission he came bouncing down with all speed and into the water he went. Being little and quick he soon had the deer out on land and of course the big pack of dogs ready to subdue it. The Indians were so elated over the feat of the "Fiste" dog; they wanted to trade one of their dogs for him. Johnny would not trade so they offered two. Still he refused. Then they offered to buy him but he could not be persuaded to part with such a valuable dog, even if he was only a "fiste"(not sure what that means).
  Fort Matson
In connection with this, Old Fort Matson, is in Adair county Indian historical item worthy of note. It has nothing in common with the Shuteye settlement excepting that Enoch (Robert's son) knew Captain Dick Matson and a few of the men of his company who built the fort in 1832. Captain Matson lived in Ralls County and was prominent in its early history. His company was made up of Ralls county settlers and adjoining territory. During the Sac and Fox Indians uprising which resulted in the Blackhawk War. Captain Matson and his company were ordered to the head waters of Salt River to build a fort and repel any Indian invasion of the frontier in that territory. The location of the fort is on Salt River. A deep trench was dug enclosing a rectangular space, as best I can remember, about 75 by 100 feet logs were cut out and set on end, close together in the trench, then dirt packed around them. They stood several feet above the ground. The stockade was built for protection against arrows and rifle balls. In 1877 when I knew the place, about 45 years after it was built, the logs were all gone. I understand they were used by the settlers for building logs, rail timber and wood, although the trench could be plainly traced all the way around. The fort was near the edge of the bluff. Bluegrass had covered the fort space and a short distance on the other three sides then bushes and trees stood thick all around. A by-road or path led to it along the ridge from the northeast charcoal made by cutting down large trees in a circle. The old tree trunks and limbs could be well seen. Down by the river they're appeared to be an old well that had been dug and walled up with split logs. Enoch (Robert's son) told this incident. When this company broke camp the men he knew was given two skillets to tote. Skillets as all other iron was made in those days were plenty large and heavy. So just when they were ready to start this man ran over to the ridge and threw one skillet as far as he could. Fifty percent off helped a lot. The company had not encountered the redskins.
    From very disconnected facts and bits of history, I learned that General Miller, on being appraised of the Sac and Fox uprising, ordered General Gentery (for which Gentery County was named). Then stationed at Jefferson barracks to go to Howard County and enlist a force of 1000 volunteers from the counties north of Missouri to Salt River, which included Ralls County. Captain Matson was in charge of the Ralls county company. Gentry was instructed to go up to the Mississippi to the Des Mains River, then proceeded over land to the Chariton River and to look out for aggressor Indians and to build defenses. Evidently Captain Matson if he were with this contingent, was given the task of creating this fort. It is more plausible to me that Captain Matson was ordered to follow the course of Salt River to its source. Then build a fort, than to think anyone could have traveled over land from the Mississippi and identify Salt River from the any of the many small rivers and streams in that section. It is a very small creek at the point I know. The memorial markers at the sight of the fort dose not stand on the exact spot of ground where the fort was built (It was near the edge of the bluff I presume a little search and careful examination the real location could be identified.)
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ROBERT P. BURNS AND LOUISA BALLA BURNS CHILD ARE AS FOLLOWS:

1) RACHEL BALLA BURNS-BORN 29 JUNE 1815 IN KENTUCKY, SHE MARRIED ABOUT 1858 IN MISSOURI TO GEORGE WASHINGTON "LOUIS" HEDRICK ABOUT 1815 IN MISSOURI. WHEN GEORGE DIED SHE REMARRIED TO AZARIAH LEWIS HUPP IN KENTUCKY ON 27 MAY 1935 AND THEY HAD THREE CHILDREN TOGETHER.
THEY HAD THREE CHILDREN TOGETHER;
 A) MARY FRANCIS HEDRICK BORN 21 SEPTEMBER 1853
B) LOUISA ELIZABETH HEDRICK BORN 13 JULY 1843
C) MARGARET MARINDATH HEDRICK BORN 1855

2) ENOCH WESLEY BURNS BORN 30 MAY 1818 IN KENTUCKY, DIED MARCH 1906 HE IS BURIED IN SHIBLEYS POINT, MISSOURI. ENOCH BURNS PASSED AWAY IN STERLING, KANASAS. THE BODY WAS BROUGHT BY WAGON FROM UNIONVILLE TO HARTFORD FOR BURIAL. ALTHOUGH IT WASN'T VERY FAR THE ROADS WERE SO MUDDY AND THEY WERE SO LONG ON THE ROAD THAT NIGHT CAME AND THE BODY WAS KEPT AT A FARM HOME FOR THE NIGHT.  ENOCH MARRIED TWICE, 1ST WIFE WAS SUSAN IRENE BOYDE MARRIED ON 6 NOVEMBER 1820, THEY HAD 10 CHILDREN TOGETHER. SECOND WIFE LETTICIE BARNARA MARRIED IN 1872, THEY HAD NO CHILDREN TOGETHER. THESE ARE ENOCH AND SUSAN'S CHILDREN;
A) SUSAN MARY BURNS BORN 7 OCTOBER 1843
B) WILLIAM ROBERT BURNS BORN 22 MAY 1845
C) LOUISA ELIZABETH BURNS
D) WESLEY BURNS
E) MARGARET BURNS BORN 15 JULY 1851
F) JAMES C BURNS BORN 3 NOVEMBER 1853
G) GEORGE SINGLETON BURNS BORN 19 MARCH 1857
H) DENNIS M. BURNS BORN 12 SEPTEMBER 1858
I) ELLEN M. BURNS BORN 11 JULY 1861
J) URBANNA BURNS BORN ABOUT 1863

3)ELIZABETH P. BURNS BORN 27 JANUARY 1821 IN RALLA COUNTY, NEW LONDON, MISSOURI, SHE MARRIED JAMES P. HEDRICK (HICKLAND, THEY HAD FOUR CHILDREN TOGETHER;
A) MAGGIE HEDRICK
B) GEORGE HEDRICK
C) MOLLIE HEDRICK BORN 10 JULY 1843
D) JIMMY HEDRICK

4) POLLY BURNS BORN ABOUT 1823 IN RALLA COUNTY, NEW LONDON, MISSOURI, DIED ABT 1873 AT SHIBLEYS POINT, MISSOURI. (NO OTHER HISTORY)

5) GEORGE NICHOLAS (REV.) BURNS BORN ABT 1823 IN RALLA COUNTY, NEW LONDON, MISSOURI. HE MARRIED SARAH ANN SHILBEY IN 1851 IN SHIBLEYS POINT, ADAIR, MISSOURI, SARAH WAS BORN 4 FEB 1830 IN LUZEME, PENNSYLVANIA AND DIED 3 MARCH 1906. GEORGE DIED ON 12 MAY 1899 IN SCHUYLER COUNTY, MISSOURI. THEY HAD 11 CHILDREN TOGETHER. THIS IS THE HISTORY I FOUND ON HIM:
--------------------------------------------------------------------   Household Record  1880 United States Census  Search results
---------------------------------------------------------------------Household:
Name  Relation Marital Status Gender Race Age Birthplace Occupation Father's Birthplace Mother's Birthplace
 George N. BURNS  Self  M  Male  W  54  MO  Minister  MD   KY  
Sarah A. BURNS  Wife  M  Female  W  50  PA  Keeping House   NY   NY  
Emmett W. BURNS  Son  S  Male  W  16  MO  Farm Laborer   MO   PA  
Earnest J. BURNS  Son  S  Male  W  12  MO  Farm Laborer  MO  PA  
Minnie L. WOODS   Niece  S  Female  W   7  MO   MO  MO  
Louisa BURNS  Mother  S  Female  W  85  KY   PA  PA  
Elizabeth HICKLAND Sister  S  Female  W  58  MO  MD  MD  
---------------------------------------------------------------------Source Information:
 Census Place Morrow, Adair, Missouri
  Family History Library Film   1254671
  NA Film Number   T9-0671
  Page Number   155C        
---------------------------------------------------------------------© 1999-2002 by Intellectual Reserve, Inc.  All rights reserved.  English approval: 3/1999
Use of this site constitutes your acceptance of these Conditions of Use (last updated: 3/22/1999).
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GEORGE NICHOLAS AND SARAH ANN SHIBLEY'S CHILDREN ARE AS FOLLOWS:
A) GEORGE BALLA BURNS BORN 5 SEPTEMBER 1852
B) ALMON FLAVIOUS BURNS BORN 8 FEBRUARY 1854
C) LOUISA ELIZABETH BURNS BORN 17 DECEMBER 1855
D) CYRENA EMMA BURNS BORN 19 JUNE 1858
E) ROBERT GEORGE BURNS BORN 17 OCTOBER 1860
F) EMETTE WASHINGTON BURNS BORN 27 MARCH 1864
G) JOCOB EMEST BURNS BORN 8 JANUARY 1868
H) MINNIE GERTRUDE WOOD BURNS BORN 3 MARCH 1873
I) MARGARET BURNS BORN 1851
J) ELLEN BURNS BORN 1861
K) SUSAN BURNS

Household Record  1880 United States Census  Search results
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Name  Relation Marital Status Gender Race Age Birthplace Occupation Father's Birthplace Mother's Birthplace
 George N. BURNS-Self-Married-Male-White-age 54-MO-Minister-MD-KY   Sarah A. BURNS-Wife-Married-Female-White-50-PA-Keeping House-NY-NY  
 Emmett W. BURNS-Son-Single-Male-White-age 16-MO.-Farm Laborer-MO-PA  
 Earnest J. BURNS-Son-Single-Male-White-age 12-MO.-Farm Laborer-MO-PA  Minnie L. WOODS-Niece-Single-Female-White-age 7-MO.-MO.-MO.  
 Louisa BURNS-Mother-Single-Female-White-age 85-KY-PA-PA  
 Elizabeth HICKLAND-Sister-Single-Female-White-age 58-MO-MD-MD  
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Source Information:
 Census Place Morrow, Adair, Missouri
  Family History Library Film   1254671
  NA Film Number   T9-0671
  Page Number   155C        
---------------------------------------------------------------------© 1999-2002 by Intellectual Reserve, Inc.  All rights reserved.  English approval: 3/1999
Use of this site constitutes your acceptance of these Conditions of Use (last updated: 3/22/1999).
Privacy Policy (last updated: 11/24/2004).    27    http://www.familysearch.org   v.2.5.0
--------------------------------------------------------------------
THE REST OF ROBERTS CHILDREN;
6) JULIA BURNS BORN ABT 1827 IN RALLA COUNTY, NEW LONDON, MISSOURI. DIED ABOUT 1872 IN SHIBLEYS POINT, MISSOURI, THEY HAD ONE CHILD TOGETHER.

7)JOHN BURNS BORN ABOUT 1829 IN RALLA COUNTY, NEW LONDON, MISSOURI,. HE WAS MARRIED TWICE, 1ST WIFE WAS ELIZABETH COX, THEY HAD THREE DAUGHTERS; MALISSA JANE, ALICE AND BETTY BURNS. JOHN'S SECOND WAS MALISSA WOO-OVERATROOT, THEY HAD ONE DAUGHTER SINA BURNS.

8) PRICE BURNS WAS BORN ABOUT 1831 IN RALLA COUNTY, NEW LONDON, MISSOURI, AND DIED IN CALIFORNIA FROM FEVER.

9) LOUISA BURNS DIED ABOUT THE AGE OF 18 YEARS OLD

10) FLAVIOUS JOSEPUA BURNS WAS BORN 29 NOVEMBER 1837 IN RALLA COUNTY, NEW LONDON, MISSOURI, AND DIED JUNE 1890 IN GREEN CITY, MISSOURI.

11) MARY EMILY BURNS BORN 4 SEPTEMBER 1819 IN MISSOURI, DIED 19 OCT 1867 IN SHIBLEYS POINT, MISSOURI. SHE MARRIED DAVID LAMBERT MADDOX ON 11 OCTOBER 1840 IN RALLA COUNTY, NEW LONDON, MISSOURI.


63. LOUISA BALLA-BALLARD

Lousisa Balla-Burns-was of Welsh descent. She was quite but always interested in everything and everybody around her. She really loved Kentucky bluegrass. So when they moved from Kentucky to Missouri, she brought some with her. When they found their land and started to build their home, she planted that grass all around the premises to get a start if possible. She was so pleased when it took off and started spreading. Then to her amazement the creek, river bottom, black gumbo land and vast areas of black upland produced bluestem wild grass luxuriantly, Sometimes tall enough to hide a man on horseback. This grass seemed to crowd out other grasses and only some prescient weeds and vines could cope with it, Even fire that often swept over it. The Prairie grass sod was harder to break up and reduce to cultivation than hazel or stumpy timberland. Besides greenhead horse fly's bread in it by countless numbers and the prairie rattlesnakes were numerous. These were much smaller than the timber snakes, which sometimes attained a length of 5 to 6 feet. The Prairie rattler was ready to strike at the least provocation and its bite was equally fatal if not more so than the timber species. The copperhead and cottonmouth snakes were two more of the most biters and most poisonous around this part. So snakes where something we always looked out for. Then there was lice, bedbugs and ticks these pest breed in timber so you see how easily they became infested. Near by swamps and marshes produced mosquitoes in flies tormented the house almost beyond belief. Gadflies were larger and Eros.
   Louise used water by the near by creek as it was excellent drinking water. She had her yard and garden just the way she wanted it. In the hot summer months, Louisa and the other women would make there own hand held fans to keep themselves cooled off. They were called "Turkey-wing Fans". They would cut off the turkey wing at the first joint then extend it, heat it to dry the exposed joints would be covered over with some sort of colored cloth and make a hoop of some to put over the hand and carry it with them. Some would put a tassel or colored yarn or ribbon on it for decoration. A turkey-wing fan always hung near the fireplace or stove to fan the fire and to hasten its burning. Pioneers had pride of beauty, appreciated convenience and desire cleanliness.
  They raised geese and ducks for food and Louise used the feathers and made pillows out of them. She knitted stockings and socks, mittens and suspenders. She had a spinning wheel, yarn and thread reels to do all her sewing. She hand-made their own soap and candles. She washed clothes on washboards, ironed with a flat iron heated by the fireplace or the stove. She quilted and pieced quilts from her looms and shuttles. She had the yard all fixed up with flowers of all kinds, sunflowers, hollyhock, morning glories, zinnias, marigolds, four-o'clocks, pink, rock moss, pet vine transplanted from the woods. Her broom was made by shaven from the stick, but bent down over the lower end of the stick and tied to form a brush, the top part of it being whittled down to the size of a broom-handle.
  She hand sewed most of their clothing from cotton and from Beavers, Otter, and Coonskins caps were in general use. Sunday coats were handmade from jean material; it was a fabric that stood the wear. They raised everything possible that they could eat and wear.
   They had apple, peach and plum trees, which she canned and made jelly's and pie fillings, along with all the many berries. Pumpkins and green beans were dried for the winter months. A big hole would be dug into the ground, straw was layered on the dirt all the way around the hole, then carrots, radish's, onions, turnips, potatoes, sweet potatoes, cabbage and apples we buried in the ground for the winter months. Also black berries, gooseberries, grapes made into grape jelly. Corn was dried out as feed for the chickens and cows and the rest of the live stock. Hay, Alfalfa, corns; peanut bushes were all dried out and stored in the barn as feed for the live stock as well. Everyone saved seeded for the next season. Little bundles of herbs, roots and barks would be gathered, dried, sacked up or left tied up in bundles for seasoning of food. Watermelons, cantaloupes and pumpkins were kept in the barn covered in hay for the winter months.
  They did suffer at times after a very bad storm and hard rains; sometimes the water would not be the best to drink Stagnant from long droughts or filled with silt from the floods. Some, wells had sulfur or copperas sediments. Streams were very crooked and had many drifts, which caused them to over flow the lowlands. Ague or chills and fever resulted. Hawks and eagles destroyed poultry, pigs and lambs, mink; weasel opossum wild cats were desperados. Forrest fires destroyed much fencing and sometimes buildings. Mud roads-ruts formed making it hard for wagons to get through, no bridges, steep hills, and deep snows and travel limited. Doctors were handicapped by the conditions of the weather, roads and travel conditions and distances. Neighbor nursed neighbor. Even the most prosperous could not secure the necessities of life. Charity was given more in help than gifts. In a disquiet school facilities hampered the many a bright boy or girl born as indomitable trust in the almighty who practiced and loved right and justice were about the only things that flourished.
  They had a neighbor that had a pair of baby bear cubs that started going to there house everyday. Something must have happened to the mother bear, as she never showed up. The family took the cubs in as pets for their children. They were well tamed; they liked the food and kind treatment from the humans. This one-day some neighbors came to spend the day with them; they all played with the cubs to the delight of both the children and the cubs. The kids decided to play jump rope. With one child on each end of the rope and one of the neighbor girls jumping the rope, all of them were barefoot. The girl jumping the rope let out the loudest scream, which brought the parents running out of the house. The little bear cub had gotten behind her while she was jumping and was sniffing her feet and had put his fuzzy paws on her bare ankles, this scared the girl, but the scream scared the bear even more and scampered away to safety.
  Some other neighbors had found two wildcats kittens. They are often called bobcats. They made nice pets and played with each other and ate from the same dish. One day they fell out over their meal for some reason. What was strange was they fought over after wards when together, whether eating or not eating. The folds decided that the only thing to do was to destroy them. They had killed one when George Nicholas Burns happened by. He was just a boy then. He proposed to take the other for a pet, mostly in sympathy for the kitten; so he took it home with him. One corner of the house was up off the ground about a foot and a half. He decided that would be a good place for it to have plenty of room. He drove little stakes all around the open side and then turned the kitten loose under the house. All went well until his mother Lousisa Balla-Burns came in mad that something had killed the goslings and eaten their heads right off right by the house. She was not long deciding that goslings had been reaching in between the stakes under the house to get some of the kitten's food and the kitten had been feasting on gosling's head. Well, George got orders to get rid of the kitten wildcat at once. He had saved the kitten's life once and not being a ruthless killer anyhow, he took it in his arms and carried it a long, long way off from the houses he was sure it would not come back, then turned it loose. He could never destroy anything without a reason. Born in 1825 when deer were almost destructive at times, he never killed one. He said they looked too innocent to shoot at.

Enoch Wesley Burns-Robert's son-Owned his own mine on his land for many years but took out just what he needed to do his own balcksmithing. The shaft form the crosshead to the crankshaft was 10 to 12 feet long and made of wooden timber about 6 to 8 inches in size. Bearing was bolted to this timber with heavy iron stirrups. It was a wood burning furnace. Such mines were called coal banks.

George Nicholas Burns-Robert's son---He was in the military when the war broke out. He was never drafted. He had been and remained anti-slavery and anti-deceddionist (?). In fact he was a "Black Abolitionist". His life was threatened but he preached on. Some said it was safer to be in the army on one side or the other than at home in Missouri. He belonged to the "Home Guard".
  At 50 years old he was fair complexion, blue eyes, sandy beard that was not real heavy. For years he wore a mustache and chin wiskers and in later years just a mustache; Sometimes smooth shaven. He was a very active man and displayed much enthusiasm and endurance. He owned land; also taught school younger in life. He began preaching at about 30 years old and quite regular pastoral work only about a few years before his death. He practiced what he preached and he preached straight Christian faith and fortitude. He was like his mother Sarah Ann Shibleys. He governed the children by his example and the respect he won from us by his personality. He was a naturalist by nature; was a great reader and studied much by observation. He knew much of the lives and habits of animals, Birds, bugs, and reptiles of this section of the country. He knew useful and harmful plants and weeds. He kept stands of wild bees and worked with difficulty (like his father Robert P. Burns). He also had wild flowers transplanted in his yard. He did not let politics or envy enter his minstrel work. He did active work with ministers of other faith. It would have been difficult to determine his church connections by listening to his sermons. He was a strict Sabbath (Sunday) keeper. A short story will help show one thing that started him in that direction. My father (George Nicholas Burns, son of Robert  P. Burns). My mother Sarah Ann Shibley's-Burns tells us that not a great while after they were married and sometime before he entered the ministry they had attended a meeting at the schoolhouse. Some special services were being conducted at the time. Two or three preachers came home with them for dinner. He had always practiced cutting the stove wood when it was needed on any day but Sunday. As it happened on this day that he didn't have enough cut to get them through. Mother came in and told him she needed wood. He got up promptly to get it. There was plenty of wood on the woodpile to be cut. But he knew where some little dead saplings, a short distance from the house that he was sure that would burn quickly so he went for them. He just felt a little embraced to cut wood in hearing distance of the preachers, being a Sunday and all. The first lick he struck of the wood that dead sapling made twice the noise it should have and each strike sounded a little louder. He got the wood all right, it burned all right as he thought it would. They had dinner all right and all went well until they started back to night service at the church, when one of the preachers very fraternally took Brother Burns to task about not observing Sunday in good old Presbyterian way. From that day forward wood and all other chores were done before Sunday.
  George tells another story; About the school days. At one time the schoolmaster was an elderly man, very bald on top with a fringe of long hair on the sides and back that hung almost to his shoulders. Apparently all of the scholars (Is what they called all the students back then), and every body else liked him and he liked them as well. I don't know how wise he was but his bald head and advanced years did not seem to take the snap out of him. Back in those days the teachers were suppose to treat the entire school at Christmas time or on the last day of school, They took their pick.  The last day of school usually came when the school money played out or the teacher decided to quit for lack of donations or his own conclusion that he had donated his serviced long enough. A proposition the teachers always had to contend with was Treat or go to the creek for a dunking. Well the old gentleman just did not see it either way. Early buccaneers were not easily bluffed when a treat was in view. School meant form the time the youngsters were big enough to get to the schoolhouse until they wanted to quit regardless of size or age. There were times that some of the students had a good growth of bread on their face and the girls equally as old. It was nothing short of a trip to the creek. Every big, little, girls and boys made a dash to get hold somewhere. Number and manpower was very much against the old School Master. Not with standing his frantic effort to resist and loud threats of what he would do to them, they soon had him off the ground and going feet first into the creek, kicking, twisting, turning, jerking, threatening louder and louder what he would do to them. One boy was a little slow and couldn't find space enough to get a hold and seemed disappointed. Presently he ran around to the old gentleman's head and healed up a lock of hair on his fingers and said, "I'll carry this much anyway." Well the old gentleman was bluffing and of course got as much enjoyment out of it all as the boys and girls. He would have almost punished any of them had they not helped. They got their treat and friendship was still better.
  After he joined the church he never used profane language. No one had heard him swear after he united with the church, till this one-day. He was shoeing a ferocious horse; it lunged at him and gave him an awful jerk. He drew his hammer back as if to strike the animal and said "GOD" but stopped right there, lowered his hammer and proceeded to finish the shoeing.
  Back in those times men would take a bushel of corn to the still and exchange for a gallon of whiskey, He was not known to drink.
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Household Record  1880 United States Census  Search results
(LOUISA WAS 85 YEARS OLD IN THIS CENSUS AND LIVING WITH HER SON GEORGE NICHOLAS BURNS).
---------------------------------------------------------------------Household: 1880 US Census
Name  Relation Marital Status Gender Race Age Birthplace Occupation Father's Birthplace Mother's Birthplace

George N. BURNS-Self-Married-Male-White-age 54-MO.-Minister-MD-KY  
Sarah A. BURNS-Wife-Married-Female-White-age50-PA-Keeping House-NY-NY Emmett W. BURNS-Son-Single-Male-White-age 16-MO-Farm Laborer-MO-PA  
Earnest J. BURNS-Son-Single-Male-White-age 12-MO-Farm Laborer-MO-PA  
Minnie L. WOODS-Niece-Single-Female-White-age 7-MO-MO-MO  
Louisa BURNS-Mother-Single-Female-White-age 85-KY-PA-PA  
Elizabeth HICKLAND-Sister-Single-Female-White-age 58-MO-MD-MD  
---------------------------------------------------------------------Source Information:
 Census Place Morrow, Adair, Missouri
  Family History Library Film   1254671
  NA Film Number   T9-0671
  Page Number   155C        
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